Bye Bye Summer

August 30, 2014

Summer ... bye bye

Summer … bye bye, photo by Ken Scott

Probably the best thing I’ve heard about “Summer 2014″ being over is that it really wasn’t much of one anyway.

I hope everyone enjoys their last weekend of summer, and that we have a warm & long fall!

View Ken’s photo bigger, see more in his massive Sleeping Bear Dunes slideshow and definitely follow him on Facebook.

Grand Portal Point

Grand Portal Point, photo by Gary McCormick

I get a lot of comments saying “No way is that Michigan” on photos, particularly on those from the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. To those people I say, “Believe it, and go there.”

View Gary’s photo background bigtacular and see more in his massive Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore slideshow.

More summer wallpaper and more Pictured Rocks on Michigan in Pictures!

Hartwick Pines by Jenny Murray

Untitled, photo by Jenny Murray

Hartwick Pines State Park – which is in my opinion one of Michigan’s coolest parks – would be opened to slant drilling if the proposal by oil & gas interests on the table is accepted by the DNR. Bridge Magazine has a feature titled Oil lease proposed under 400-year-old virgin pines that begins:

About 9,700 acres of Hartwick Pines State Park and surrounding land near Grayling are on a list of parcels nominated by oil and gas companies for lease of mineral rights. The lease of those parcels, which include the largest remaining old growth white pine trees south of the Mackinac Bridge as well as the rest of one of Michigan’s most popular parks, is likely to be included in a Department of Natural Resources auction Oct. 29.

No development would be allowed on the ground surface. But the leases open the possibility of slant or horizontal drilling under trees that have grown since the first Europeans stepped foot in the region.
While mineral exploration deep below the surface isn’t likely to harm the trees, the possibility of drilling raises concerns about the boom of oil rigs at a beloved state park, and is symbolic of the occasional tension in the state between business interests and Pure Michigan.

“There are some special places in the state that oil and gas development should not be happening,” said Jack Schmitt, deputy director of the Michigan League for Conservation Voters. “And Hartwick Pines is one of them.”

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) is accepting public comments on its decision to lease mineral rights in Hartwick Pines State Park through September 5th.

The Michigan LCV has established a petition if you want to weigh in. They note that Hartwick Pines is home to some of the few forests that were protected from Michigan’s logging boom and holds the largest contiguous stand of old-growth white pine in the Lower Peninsula. The park is also home to the East Branch of the legendary Au Sable River, a blue-ribbon trout stream.

Thanks to Jenny for bringing this to my attention. View her photo bigger and see more of her diptychs right here.

Glen Haven Dune Hike

Glen Haven Dune Hike, photo by Jess Clifton

I don’t think that enough is made of the fact that as long as you’re in Michigan, you are never more than 85 miles from one of the Great Lakes. To make matters better, Michigan law permits you to freely walk the entire Great Lakes shoreline so get out and have some adventures this weekend!

About this photo, Jess writes: These images were taken on a hike on the Lake Michigan shoreline in Glen Haven MI roughly two years ago. Can’t recommend this hike enough! (I’m curious if any shipwreck remnants are still explorable with this year’s higher waterline.)

I’m curious too and will try to find out!

View Jess’ photo background bigtacular and see more in her Glen Haven Shipwreck Hike slideshow.

Lots more Michigan beaches and more Michigan summer wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

Manabezho Falls Presque Isle River , Porcupine Mountains State Park

Manabezho Falls Presque Isle River, Porcupine Mountains State Park, photo by John McCormick

Last month Michigan in Pictures regular John McCormick aka Michigan Nut had a feature on the Pure Michigan Blog titled Eight Reasons to Get Out and Explore Michigan’s Waterfalls this Summer.

I think that I may have featured all 8 shots here on Michigan in Pictures, so here’s a pic I hadn’t seen of Manabezho Falls. View it bigger on Flickr, follow Michigan Nut on Facebook and if you need 98 more reasons, here’s John’s Michigan Waterfalls slideshow.

More waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures and speaking of Manabezho definitely check out the story of Manabozho and His Toe.

Fort Michilimackinac

Fort Michilamackinac, photo by Mark Swanson

The State of Michigan’s page on Fort Michilimackinac says:

Fort Michilimackinac was built by the French on the south shore of the Straits of Mackinac in approximately 1715. Previously, French presence in the Straits area was focused in what is now St. Ignace where Father Marquette established a Jesuit mission in 1671 and Fort de Baude was established around 1683. In 1701, Cadillac moved the French garrison from St. Ignace to Detroit, which led to the closing of the mission and considerably reduced French occupation in the area. Several years later, as the French sought to expand the fur trade, they built Fort Michilimackinac to re-establish a French presence in the Straits area.

Fort Michilimackinac was a strategically located fortified trading post. The fort was not built primarily as a military facility but as a link in the French trade system, which extended from Montreal through the Great Lakes region and northwest to Lake Winnipeg and beyond. Overlooking the Straits of Mackinac connecting Lake Huron and Lake Michigan, the fort served as a supply post for French traders operating in the western Great Lakes region and as a primary stopping-off point between Montreal and the western country. Fort Michilimackinac was an island of French presence on the frontier from which the French carried out the fur trade, sought alliances with native peoples, and protected their interests against the colonial ambitions of other European nations.

In 1761 the French relinquished Fort Michilimackinac to the British who had assumed control of Canada as a result of their victory in the French and Indian War. Under the British, the fort continued to serve as a major fur trade facility. The Ottawa and Chippewa in the Straits area, however, found British policies harsh compared to those of the French and they resented the British takeover. In 1763 as part of Pontiac’s Rebellion, a group of Chippewa staged a ball game outside the stockade to create a diversion and gain entrance to the post and then attacked and killed most of the British occupants. The use of Fort Michilimackinac came to an end in 1781 when the British abandoned the post and moved to Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island.

You can get more including visitor information at Colonial Michilimackinac and also check out this History Channel program on Pontiac’s Rebellion (the Michilimackinac story is about 20 minutes in).

View Mark’s photo background big and see more in his Mackinac, Michigan slideshow.

More from Mackinac on Michigan in Pictures!

Reflection

June 30, 2014

Reflection by Bill VanderMolen

Reflection, photo by Bill VanderMolen

Bill took this photo in the Lake Erie Metropark (aka Brownstown Park). View his photo bigger and see more in his Birds slideshow.

More about Great Egrets on Michigan in Pictures.

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