Manabezho Falls Presque Isle River , Porcupine Mountains State Park

Manabezho Falls Presque Isle River, Porcupine Mountains State Park, photo by John McCormick

Last month Michigan in Pictures regular John McCormick aka Michigan Nut had a feature on the Pure Michigan Blog titled Eight Reasons to Get Out and Explore Michigan’s Waterfalls this Summer.

I think that I may have featured all 8 shots here on Michigan in Pictures, so here’s a pic I hadn’t seen of Manabezho Falls. View it bigger on Flickr, follow Michigan Nut on Facebook and if you need 98 more reasons, here’s John’s Michigan Waterfalls slideshow.

More waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures and speaking of Manabezho definitely check out the story of Manabozho and His Toe.

Slice of Wonder

June 16, 2014

Upper Tahquamenon

Upper Tahquamenon, photo by Jasondoubleuel

Jason shared this shot of one of my favorite views in Michigan, the Upper Tahquamenon Falls, in the Michigan Cover Photos Group. It’s the new cover photo for the Michigan in Pictures Facebook page and (in my opinion) looks just about perfect.

View his photo bigger and see more in his Summer slideshow!

Much more about the Tahquamenon Falls on Michigan in Pictures.

Middle Hungarian Falls

May 29, 2014

Middle Hungarian Falls

Middle Hungarian Falls, photo by David Clark

GoWaterfalling.com is the go-to site for Michigan waterfalls. About Middle Hungarian Falls they write (in part):

There are three falls 15 feet or higher on a half mile stretch of Dover Creek, plus a couple of smaller drops. In the spring time, or after some good rains, these waterfalls are very impressive. Unfortunately the creek has a very small watershed, and the falls are often reduced to trickles.

The three main drops are usually referred to as the upper, middle and lower falls. The upper falls is around 20 feet high. The water spills over an irreguarly shaped cliff into a small gorge.

Downstream of the upper falls is a dam and artificial lake. Below the dam are a couple of smaller drops, and the middle falls. The middle falls is also about 20 feet high, and is perhaps the most scenic in lower water. The cliff face here is smoother, and the water is not segmented the way it is at the upper falls. The middle falls is also the easiest to reach and there are plenty of good viewing spots.

Read on for more including directions and info about the lower Hungarian Falls.

View David’s photo background big and see more in his Waterfalls slideshow.

Many (many) more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

n2c_113-4482

n2c_113-4482, photo by Gowtham

Gowtham writes:

Established in 1846, Copper Falls mine was a collection of several copper mine shafts and adits (definition below). Owl Creek — in what was once one of the richest fissure veins in the Keweenaw — seems to make a magical (and a seasonal) appearance out of a hillside draining the now closed Copper Falls mine to form this quite spectacular and scenic-looking Copper Adit Falls. With the nearby remnants of an old stamp mill, this waterfall is also known as Stamp Mill Falls.

Citing Wikipedia, an adit is an entrance to an underground mine which is horizontal or nearly horizontal, by which the mine can be entered, drained of water, ventilated, and minerals extracted at the lowest convenient level.

The Copper Country Explorer’s entry on Copper Falls begins:

Stamp Mills relied on two things in order to separate copper: water and gravity. Any stamp mill would be built near a source of water such as a river or lake. It also would be build along a hill, in order to make the greatest use of gravity. Because of this we started our search along the creek that had cut a path through the sands – Owl Creek.

Owl Creek was the lifeblood of the Copper Falls Mine. Steam stamps required water, and along the rugged ridges of the Copper Falls a natural source existed. Fed from atop the ridge by a lake of the same name, Owl Creek drops over 500 feet to the marshlands along Superior’s shore. This creek not only provided water to the mine and mill, but the potential energy stored in its banks could easily turn a water wheel for power (mechanical power, since electricity had yet to be invented). It was a perfect spot for a mill.

Read on for lots more and explore the Copper Falls Mill at with the Copper Country Explorer.

View Gowtham’s photo bigger and see more of his photos from the area on his website.

More waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures!

Trout lily (3 of 3)

Trout lily (3 of 3), photo by Heather Higham

I love old books, and was happy to find Wild Flowers Worth Knowing by Neltje Blanchan, a 1917 book that is available online through Project Gutenberg. The entry for Yellow Adder’s Tongue; Trout Lily; Dog-tooth “Violet” (Erythronium americanum) is a good example of the descriptive & endearing turns of phrase you often find in books from another age:

Flower - Solitary, pale russet yellow, rarely tinged with purple, slightly fragrant, 1 to 2 in. long, nodding from the summit of a root-stalk 6 to 12 in, high, or about as tall as the leaves. Perianth bell-shaped, of 6 petal-like, distinct segments, spreading at tips, dark spotted within; 6 stamens; the club-shaped style with 3 short, stigmatic ridges. Leaves: 2, unequal, grayish green, mottled and streaked with brown or all green, oblong, 3 to 8 in. long, narrowing into clasping petioles.

Preferred Habitat - Moist open woods and thickets, brooksides.

Flowering Season – March-May.

Distribution – Nova Scotia to Florida, westward to the Mississippi.

Colonies of these dainty little lilies, that so often grow beside leaping brooks where and when the trout hide, justify at least one of their names; but they have nothing in common with the violet or a dog’s tooth. Their faint fragrance rather suggests a tulip; and as for the bulb, which in some of the lily-kin has toothlike scales, it is in this case a smooth, egg-shaped corm, producing little round offsets from its base. Much fault is also found with another name on the plea that the curiously mottled and delicately pencilled leaves bring to mind, not a snake’s tongue, but its skin, as they surely do. Whoever sees the sharp purplish point of a young plant darting above ground in earliest spring, however, at once sees the fitting application of adder’s tongue. But how few recognize their plant friends at all seasons of the year!

Every one must have noticed the abundance of low-growing spring flowers in deciduous woodlands, where, later in the year, after the leaves overhead cast a heavy shade, so few blossoms are to be found, because their light is seriously diminished. The thrifty adder’s tongue, by laying up nourishment in its storeroom underground through the winter, is ready to send its leaves and flower upward to take advantage of the sunlight the still naked trees do not intercept, just as soon as the ground thaws.

View Heather’s photo background bigtacular and see more in her Up Close slideshow.

Many more Michigan flowers and more Spring wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures!

Milky Way at Tahquamenon Falls

Milky Way at Tahquamenon Falls, photo by John McCormick

I try not to blog photos from the same photographer close together, but sometimes the photos have different ideas. John aka Michigan Nut took this shot on April 26th at Michigan’s largest waterfall and writes:

Upper Michigan still has over a foot of snow on the ground and the Tahquamenon river is RAGING from the runoff. The mist was freezing on my camera. I think the light on the left side of the image is coming from the little town of Paradise, Michigan.

The official Tahquamenon Falls Facebook has a great video of the spring flow which can approach 50,000 gallons per second!

View his photo of the Tahquamenon Falls bigger and see more in his jaw-dropping Michigan waterfalls slideshow.

More Tahquamenon Falls and more waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

 

Winter at Tahquamenon Falls

February 24, 2014

Winter at Tahquamenon Falls Michigan's Upper Peninsula

Winter at Tahquamenon Falls, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, photo by Michigan Nut

John took this shot a couple of months ago at Michigan’s largest waterfall. Several years the crew from Wild Weekend TV went to the falls in wintertime. They talked with Lark Ludlow, owner of the Tahquamenon Falls Brewery and Pub about the history & lore of the Tahquamenon Falls – click to check it out.

Check it out bigger and see more in John’s Tahquamenon Falls slideshow. Don’t sleep on his Michigan Nut Photography page on Facebook either!

Lots more Tahquamenon Falls on Michigan in Pictures.

Black Slate Falls

January 30, 2014

Black Slate Falls, Baraga County, MI, April, 2010

Black Slate Falls, Baraga County, MI, April, 2010, photo by Norm Powell (napowell30d)

On Scenic USA, Ken Reese has some info about Black Slate Falls:

Gathering momentum on the slopes of Mount Arvon, Michigan’s highest peak, the Slate River drops northward into Lake Superior. At one time when slate was a predominant roofing material, Arvon Road led to the small town of Arvon and a slate quarry. Today the town has all but disappeared, and piles of waste slate mark the quarry site.

West of the Slate River, Arvon Road leads to this beautiful setting of Black Slate Falls. Here, tucked in the woods is a picturesque little falls as it drops over slate ledges. Quartzite and Black Slate falls are found at the end of Arvon Road. For those seeking more woodland waterfalls, this wild river leads down to Slate (the largest drop), Slide and Ecstasy falls, just three miles downriver. Hiker’s notes indicate it’s a lot easier to reach Slate Falls from Skanee Road, where Arvon Road gets its start.

GoWaterfalling adds that Black Slate Falls are one of several waterfalls on the Slate River.

View Norm’s photo bigger and see more of his waterfall photos on Flickr!

Many more waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

Behind Tannery Falls

January 25, 2014

Behind Tannery Falls

Behind Tannery Falls, photo by Brian Kainulainen Photography

#40 in Jesse’s 1000 Things to Do in the U.P. is to Check out Tannery Falls:

Tannery Falls (sometimes referred to as Rudy M. Olson Memorial), along with MNA Memorial Falls (sometimes called Twin Falls) often get missed by unknowing visitors who follow the signs to nearby Munising Falls, leaving these two cool waterfalls in their touristy dust. Well, that’s not going to be you.

…It’s a steep uphill climb at first, but it’s short. After a minute or so of uphill walking, you’ll skirt along a sandstone cliff and end up face to face with a very cool waterfall. It’s a serene little area with more than a few little nooks and cranny’s to explore. I took my son there and he had a blast running around, saying “look at this!” a hundred times. At some point I’d like to come back with my wife and have a picnic here. Yes, I’m cheesy like that.

There are no signs urging you to “stay on the trail.” You can walk right up to, behind, and around the falls if you want to. If it’s a hot day, stand right under the thing and cool off! It might not be a bad idea to bring a swimsuit just in case. :)

 

Not sure about the wisdom of that today though. Read on for more including instructions on how to get there and definitely check out 1000 Things to Do in the U.P.  for lots more ideas about fun in the Upper Peninsula!

Brian shared this on the Michigan in Pictures Facebook page. View it bigger and see more of his work at Brian Kainulainen Photography!

Many (many) more Michigan waterfalls await you on Michigan in Pictures!

 

Onekama Sunset

January 17, 2014

Onekama Sunset

Onekama Sunset, photo by lomeranger

I hope you all had a great week and that you’ll have a chance to get out and enjoy Michigan this weekend.

Wikipedia says that Onekama is a village in Manistee County located on the shores of Portage Lake, and that the town’s name is derived from “Ona-ga-maa,” an Anishinaabe word that means “singing water.” Here’s a Google map.

View Jason’s photo background bigtacular, see more in his Landscape IV slideshow and (if you like) purchase it right here.

More winter wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

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