Winter at Tahquamenon Falls

February 24, 2014

Winter at Tahquamenon Falls Michigan's Upper Peninsula

Winter at Tahquamenon Falls, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, photo by Michigan Nut

John took this shot a couple of months ago at Michigan’s largest waterfall. Several years the crew from Wild Weekend TV went to the falls in wintertime. They talked with Lark Ludlow, owner of the Tahquamenon Falls Brewery and Pub about the history & lore of the Tahquamenon Falls – click to check it out.

Check it out bigger and see more in John’s Tahquamenon Falls slideshow. Don’t sleep on his Michigan Nut Photography page on Facebook either!

Lots more Tahquamenon Falls on Michigan in Pictures.

Black Slate Falls

January 30, 2014

Black Slate Falls, Baraga County, MI, April, 2010

Black Slate Falls, Baraga County, MI, April, 2010, photo by Norm Powell (napowell30d)

On Scenic USA, Ken Reese has some info about Black Slate Falls:

Gathering momentum on the slopes of Mount Arvon, Michigan’s highest peak, the Slate River drops northward into Lake Superior. At one time when slate was a predominant roofing material, Arvon Road led to the small town of Arvon and a slate quarry. Today the town has all but disappeared, and piles of waste slate mark the quarry site.

West of the Slate River, Arvon Road leads to this beautiful setting of Black Slate Falls. Here, tucked in the woods is a picturesque little falls as it drops over slate ledges. Quartzite and Black Slate falls are found at the end of Arvon Road. For those seeking more woodland waterfalls, this wild river leads down to Slate (the largest drop), Slide and Ecstasy falls, just three miles downriver. Hiker’s notes indicate it’s a lot easier to reach Slate Falls from Skanee Road, where Arvon Road gets its start.

GoWaterfalling adds that Black Slate Falls are one of several waterfalls on the Slate River.

View Norm’s photo bigger and see more of his waterfall photos on Flickr!

Many more waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

Behind Tannery Falls

January 25, 2014

Behind Tannery Falls

Behind Tannery Falls, photo by Brian Kainulainen Photography

#40 in Jesse’s 1000 Things to Do in the U.P. is to Check out Tannery Falls:

Tannery Falls (sometimes referred to as Rudy M. Olson Memorial), along with MNA Memorial Falls (sometimes called Twin Falls) often get missed by unknowing visitors who follow the signs to nearby Munising Falls, leaving these two cool waterfalls in their touristy dust. Well, that’s not going to be you.

…It’s a steep uphill climb at first, but it’s short. After a minute or so of uphill walking, you’ll skirt along a sandstone cliff and end up face to face with a very cool waterfall. It’s a serene little area with more than a few little nooks and cranny’s to explore. I took my son there and he had a blast running around, saying “look at this!” a hundred times. At some point I’d like to come back with my wife and have a picnic here. Yes, I’m cheesy like that.

There are no signs urging you to “stay on the trail.” You can walk right up to, behind, and around the falls if you want to. If it’s a hot day, stand right under the thing and cool off! It might not be a bad idea to bring a swimsuit just in case. :)

 

Not sure about the wisdom of that today though. Read on for more including instructions on how to get there and definitely check out 1000 Things to Do in the U.P.  for lots more ideas about fun in the Upper Peninsula!

Brian shared this on the Michigan in Pictures Facebook page. View it bigger and see more of his work at Brian Kainulainen Photography!

Many (many) more Michigan waterfalls await you on Michigan in Pictures!

 

Onekama Sunset

January 17, 2014

Onekama Sunset

Onekama Sunset, photo by lomeranger

I hope you all had a great week and that you’ll have a chance to get out and enjoy Michigan this weekend.

Wikipedia says that Onekama is a village in Manistee County located on the shores of Portage Lake, and that the town’s name is derived from “Ona-ga-maa,” an Anishinaabe word that means “singing water.” Here’s a Google map.

View Jason’s photo background bigtacular, see more in his Landscape IV slideshow and (if you like) purchase it right here.

More winter wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

UP Michigan Ice Fest001

UP Michigan Ice Fest, photo by ebaillies

The annual Michigan Ice Fest takes place January 30 – February 2, 2014 in and around Munising. This annual festival takes place the 1st weekend of February every year and gives you a chance to look at and demo the latest and greatest equipment, meet some of the worlds best climbers and see what they’ve climbed all over the world. There’s also climbing socials and even intro to ice climbing classes using the ice climbing paradise that surrounds Munising.

Click the link above and be sure to check out their Michigan Ice Fest photo gallery on Facebook including galleries from 2009, 2010 & 2012 Ice Fests!

As the Ice Fest organizers note, the UP offers as much as 6 months of climbable ice! The Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore Ice Climbing page tells more:

Ice climbing is becoming a popular winter sport at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. With ample lake effect snow, numerous waterfalls, porous sandstone cliffs, and the water which seeps out of the rock layers, curtains and columns of ice are common.

Snow and ice are generally present by the second or third week in December and remain until late March. While ice frequently forms along the Pictured Rocks cliffs above Lake Superior, these areas are not recommended for climbing due to hazardous exposure to the lake. The most accessible ice columns are found along the Pictured Rocks escarpment between Munising Falls and Sand Point along Sand Point Road.

Eric took this photo at the Ice Fest in 2012. Check it out bigger and see lots more great shots in his slideshow.

More ice climbing on Michigan in Pictures!

Pinnacle Falls - (Yellow Dog river) - near Big Bay, Michigan

Pinnacle Falls – (Yellow Dog river) – near Big Bay, Michigan, photo by Michigan Nut

The Pinnacle Falls entry at GoWaterfalling.com explains that:

Pinnacle Falls is located on a wild stretch of the Yellow Dog River, roughly 8 miles south west of Big Bay. The Yellow Dog has carved out an impressive gorge that must be around 200 feet deep. The falls is about 25 feet high, and is a steep cascade like many of the falls in the area. The falls is named for the large pinnacle of rock on the right side of the falls.

Read on for comprehensive directions and a map of the many Marquette area waterfalls.

John writes:

This was I think the most remote Michigan waterfall I have been to. The only directions we had was an article written in 2006 from some guy who found it on his mountain bike. He included the GPS way-points but when we reached it there was no falls or trail around. We went down one last two-track with the jeep after trying for a couple of hours, and finally found the trail to the falls. It was about a 25 minute hike. The Yellow Dog has carved out an impressive gorge back there. This would be a great place to pack in and pitch a a tent for a night or two. Very beautiful Waterfall. The photo doesn’t do this area justice.

That’s a pretty deep hole right below the falls, I couldn’t resist stripping down and swimming for awhile. :)

That’s probably ill-advised for today! View John’s photo bigger and see more in his awesome 80+ photo Michigan Waterfalls slideshow.

Many (many) more waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

Shining Cloud Falls

Shining Cloud Falls, photo by Mikeydubz1

GoWaterfalling.com is the premier site for Michigan waterfall information, and they write that Shining Cloud Falls:

…is the largest, and one of the wildest backcountry waterfalls in Porcupine Mountains State Park. You will have to hike at least 5 miles in to see the falls, and another 5 miles to get back. If you are looking for a good long day hike this is a winner. In addition to the main falls there are also a number of smaller cascades, and whatever route you take there is lots of wilderness scenery.

The total drop of the falls is about 20′. The falls consists of two parts, a slide on the left, and a plunge on the right. In higher water the two parts merge, but in lower water the two parts are distinct. Plunge falls are rare around Lake Superior.

They say that the real challenge is reaching this remote fall, but that it’s definitely worth the trip – read on for instructions!

Check Mikey’s photo out bigger and see more in his Porcupine Mountains slideshow.

Many more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures!

Lower Falls Sturgeon Gorge

Lower Falls Sturgeon Gorge, photo by Shadows in Reflection

Say hello to your last early evening light for a while today, and don’t forget to set your clocks back for Daylight Savings Time tonight!

Back in May I posted a pic of Sturgeon Falls raging with the spring snowmelt. I thought Michael’s photo provided a cool look at how much the snowmelt changes the flow of UP rivers from spring to fall.

Michael writes that this is an awesome place and a must visit if you like waterfalls. See it bigger and see more in his slideshow.

For a look at how to get there, check out the North Country Trail guide for the Sturgeon Gorge area and see many more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

Misty Moonrise

Misty Moonrise, photo by ShaneWyatt

Here’s a gorgeous shot of the moon rising over the mist of Lower Taquamenon Falls – Shane caught a shooting star too!

View his photo bigger and see more including another night shot at the falls in Shane’s stars slideshow.

Fall at Spray Falls

October 9, 2013

Spray Falls Autumn Colors

Spray Falls Autumn Colors, photo by James Marvin Phelps

James took this photo four years ago today at Spray Falls in the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore.

Check this out background big and see more great shots from the UP in his Michigan Fall Trip 2009 slideshow.

More about Spray Falls on Michigan in Pictures.

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