The Detroit Flood of 2014

August 13, 2014

DSC_0004

Untitled, photo by Michigan State Police Emergency Management and Homeland Security Division

On Monday, the city of Detroit was hit with over 4.5″ of rain, the second highest one-day total following 4.7″ on July 31, 1925. The rain hit during the afternoon rush hour and submerged freeways and neighborhoods.

There’s some photos and video from mLive, some pics from Twitter and Instagram put together by Oliver Darcy and more in this Huffington Post feature on the flooding with a bunch of photos and a few videos.

View this photo background big and see more in the State Police slideshow of the flooding.

More floods on Michigan in Pictures.

Farewell Robin Williams

August 12, 2014

Robin Williams

Robin Williams, photo by Gene Schilling

“Comedy is acting out optimism.”
~Robin Williams

Like many who have enjoyed the zany & genuine wit of Robin Williams, I was saddened to hear that he lost his lifelong battle with depression.

View Gene’s photo bigger, see more from this show in his Robin Williams @ The Sound Board, Detroit, MI (assignment for MotorCityBlog.net) slideshow and check out musicimagesbygene.com for some great concert photography.

PS: I found this quote in a Huffington Post article with some really great shots of Williams.

watercolor

August 11, 2014

watercolor by paulh192 (kingfisher)

watercolor, by paulh192

You really ought to view Paul’s photo of a kingfisher contemplating its next meal bigger. More in his slideshow.

Summer Corn

Summer Corn, photo by PepOmint

Corn is coming in – hope you get to taste some this weekend!!

View PepOmint’s photo background big and see more in her slideshow.

 

Sleeping Bear Persied

Sleeping Bear Perseids, photo by Kenneth Snyder

Without question the best meteor shower of the summer in Michigan is the Perseids, EarthSky’s Everything you need to know about the Perseid Meteor Shower has (predictably) all kinds of details and diagrams to help you get the most out of this annual display. The most important thing is to start watching now as the August supermoon is full this weekend.

Every year, from around July 17 to August 24, our planet Earth crosses the orbital path of Comet Swift-Tuttle, the parent of the Perseid meteor shower. Debris from this comet litters the comet’s orbit, but we don’t really get into the thick of the comet rubble until after the first week of August. The bits and pieces from Comet Swift-Tuttle slam into the Earth’s upper atmosphere at some 210,000 kilometers (130,000 miles) per hour, lighting up the nighttime with fast-moving Perseid meteors. If our planet happens to pass through an unusually dense clump of meteoroids – comet rubble – we’ll see an elevated number of meteors.

…The swift-moving and often bright Perseid meteors frequently leave persistent trains – ionized gas trails lasting for a few moments after the meteor has already gone. Watch for these meteors to streak the nighttime in front of the age-old, lore-laden constellations from late night until dawn as we approach the second weekend in August. The Perseids should put out a few dozen meteors per hour in the wee hours of the mornings of August 11, 12 and 13.

Read on for lots more.

View his photo big as the sky and see more in his Sleeping Bear Dunes slideshow.

More meteors on Michigan in Pictures!

Clare Harrison MI Spikehorn Meyers Clare County MI RPPC 1930's-40's M77

Clare Harrison MI Spikehorn Meyers Clare County MI, photo by Don…The UpNorth Memories Guy

Here’s a Throwback Thursday featuring one of Northern Michigan’s most colorful characters:

Harrison’s most colorful character was John “Spikehorn” Meyers, known to thousands of Michigan residents simply as Spikehorn. He was a showman, naturalist, politician, coal miner, tile manufacturer, furniture builder, inventor, realtor, bear hunter, lumberjack, and above all, individualist. The old gentleman had a fertile imagination under his white thatch of hair and full white beard.

According to neighbors, Spikehorn’s interest in the woods and buckskins developed around 1930, when he opened his Bear and Deer Park established on his property at the corner of US-27 and M-61. Rumor has it the park even contained an occasional buffalo.

Spikehorn and his friend, Red Eagle, dressed in buckskins for tourists and treated them to tales of their adventures in the woods. He enjoyed feeding his pets sweets, popcorn, and pop and loved posing with his deer and bears for cameras.

His enemies were the Conservation Officers, as indicated by the sign in front of his business: “Feed Conservation Officers to the Bear.”

Spikehorn also appears in one of the best Michigan history videos, Roaming Through Michigan, a classic newsreel.

View John’s photo big as a bear and see more in his Spikehorn Meyers & Harrison MI slideshow.

Tons more history and more roadside attractions on Michigan in Pictures!

Sand Point (Baraga) Lighthouse, MI

Sand Point (Baraga) Lighthouse, MI, photo by Mark

Sand Point Lighthouse in Baraga is one of two Michigan Sand Point Lights listed in Terry Pepper’s Seeing the Light. (the other being Sand Point in Escanaba):

At the dawn of the 1870’s, the small town of L’Anse found itself in the thick of the iron boom. With plans in place to complete the construction of the Marquette, Houghton and Ontonagon Railroad tracks into town in 1872, the naturally protected harbor at L’Anse was considered to be primary competition for Marquette and Escanaba ore shipments. With an infusion of East Coast investment dollars, ore docks and wharves quickly sprang up along the waterfront and the town’s population skyrocketed as people moved into the area to take advantage of the coming boom.

Expecting a dramatic rise in maritime traffic, the city fathers began applying every possible pressure to the Federal Government for the construction of a lighthouse to guide mariners into the harbor. Agreeing with the areas potential, the Lighthouse Board reported in 1871 that on completion of the railroad “the place will at once become an important point for the shipment of iron ore. A good harbor is found at the head of the bay, and it should be lighted.

…In September 1873, New York financier Jay Cooke declared bankruptcy. Among other interests, Cooke had served as primary financier of the North’s cause in the Civil War and was the principal backer of the Northern Pacific Railroad. The company’s collapse rippled throughout the country, with almost all of the nation’s railroads declaring bankruptcy. This Financial Panic of 1873, had disastrous impact on the nation’s business, ore shipments from Lake Superior virtually dried-up, and the docks at L’Anse sat empty

The light was finally exhibited on the night of August 10, 1878, but it has to be one of the most hard luck lights on the lakes. Read all about the trials and tribulations of Sand Point at Seeing the Light and also see some great old photos!

View Mark’s photo background big and see more in his massive Mark’s Lights slideshow.

Many more Michigan lighthouses on Michigan in Pictures.

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