Tahquamenon Falls by LakeSuperiorPhoto

Tahquamenon Falls, by LakeSuperiorPhoto

It’s certainly no secret that one of my favorite Michigan photographers is Shawn Stockman Malone of Lake Superior Photo. The latest national outlet to recognize her work is Huffington Post Detroit, which assembled a collection of her UP Night Sky photos in a nice feature that says (in part):

Stockman-Malone runs photography gallery LakeSuperiorPhoto in Marquette, Michigan, a bustling college and former mining town on the Lake Superior coast.

…While Stockman-Malone does monitor sun weather to try to catch views of the Northern Lights, much of her work is guided by chance — and by being ready to photograph at any time. Once, her dog was scared and woke her up when lightning struck, and she caught a shot of the Northern Lights over the storm.

“You never know what Mother Nature has up her sleeve, and just hope you catch it,” Stockman-Malone said about her night photography practice in an email to The Huffington Post. “The Milky Way moves across the sky and can be found rising and setting in different directions throughout the year, so there will always be new perspectives in new locations. Same thing goes for moonrises and moonsets. Then there’s meteor showers, conjunction of planets, appearance of comets, etc. so there’s always something new happening.”

Click through for more and lots more incredible night shots!

View this photo and more bigger at Huffington Post Detroit, purchase prints at lakesuperiorphoto.com and get your daily dose of Upper Peninsula Amazing through the Lake Superior Photo Facebook.

Winter is Coming

August 22, 2014

Hesperia Propane Tanks by John Mickevich

Hesperia Propane Tanks, photo by John Mickevich

“Winter is Coming.”
~ House Stark

A little reminder to soak up summer while we have it. If you need a little more, the Old Farmer’s Almanac says:

Published Wednesday, the New Hampshire-based almanac predicts a ‘super-cold’ winter in the eastern two-thirds of the country. The west will remain a little bit warmer than normal.

Publishers claim their forecasts–based on a ‘secret’ formula that looks at weather and astronomical trends–have an 80 percent accuracy rate.

‘Colder is just almost too familiar a term,’ Editor Janice Stillman said. ‘Think of it as a refriger-nation.’

John says this row of propane tanks caught his eye on a recent drive down M-20 near Hesperia. View his photo bigger and see more in his Ilford film slideshow.

More black & white photography on Michigan in Pictures.

Nelson Canyon Falls

Nelson Canyon Falls, photo by Sven

About Nelson Canyon Falls, Sven writes:

Nelson Canyon Falls is a remote, somewhat hard to find waterfall in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. It proved to be well worth the effort to seek this gem out. The canyon is an amazing place hidden deep in an old growth forest. The walls are 30+ feet high in places. While these photos were taken in the fall, after a somewhat dry summer the volume of water flowing through is low. But the low water did create some awesome swirling whirlpools spinning with Autumn leaves. The initial plunge was just as amazing featuring two waterfalls dropping 15 feet to the canyon floor.

During spring runoff this place must be roaring with the snowmelt. This is why I seek out these hidden gems. Nelson Canyon has to be at the top of my list of favorite U.P. waterfalls. Enjoy!

The Waterfalls page at lakegogebic.com has directions:

Directions: Three miles West of Lake Gogebic on Highway 64 take C Camp Rd; cross Nelson Creek (culverts) and continue for almost one mile until you are on your way uphill there is a two track (path). Park and walk the two track in and as it peters out or turns right; walk angling left. When you get to the river walk downstream.

View Sven’s photo bigger and see more in his UP Michigan Waterfalls slideshow.

Many (many) more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures!

Regrets

Regrets, photo by Ann Fisher

‘Tis the season when Michiganders wonder what Noah was thinking…

View Ann’s photo background big and see more in her U.P. 2014 slideshow.

More funny business on Michigan in Pictures.

Remote Lake Superior by Lake Superior Photo

Grand Island, North Side, photo by Lake Superior Photo

The Grand Island National Recreation Area is located on Grand Island off the coast of the U.P. just west of Munising. The island is accessible by private boat or ferry and features cliffs like those in the Pictured Rocks, with some as high as 300 feet! There’s a hiking/biking trail around the island, but Shawn says this location is probably only accessible by boat.

You really should check this shot out background bigtacular on Facebook. There’s lots more great pics in Lake Superior Photo’s amazing gallery too. Do yourself a favor and follow Shawn & Lake Superior Photo if you’re not already and purchase prints online or in her gallery & studio in downtown Marquette!

More summer wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

 

Snowshoeing the U.P.

Snowshoeing the U.P., photo by Ashley Williams

Ashley took this shot in February in the Upper Peninsula, and by “February” I mean “this Monday”. It’s a beautiful scene for sure, but I think I speak for most of us when I say, “You’re drunk, Winter. Go home.”

View her photo bigger and see more in her Nature slideshow.

Frigid Auroras Over Superior

Frigid Auroras Over Superior, photo by Michigan Nature Photog

NOAA’s current space weather forecast reports an M Class (moderate) solar flare from solar region AR2002. Spaceweather.com adds that AR2002 has destabilized its magnetic field, making it more likely to erupt, and that NOAA forecasters are estimating a 60% chance of M-class flares and a 10% chance of X-class flares during the next 24 hours. X-class flares are major solar events that can spawn incredible auroras visible far to the south of us, planet-wide radio blackouts and long-lasting radiation storms. Click to Space Weather for a video of AR2002 development.

While there’s not much chance of a major event, I thought it was interesting that 25 years ago this week,  one of the most significant solar storms in memory created a spectacle in the skies as it demonstrated the power and danger of solar weather to modern society. A Conflagration of Storms begins:

On Thursday, March 9, 1989 astronomers at the Kitt Peak Solar Observatory spotted a major solar flare in progress. Eight minutes later, the Earth’s outer atmosphere was struck by a wave of powerful ultraviolet and X-ray radiation. Then the next day, an even more powerful eruption launched a cloud of gas 36 times the size of the from Active Region 5395 nearly dead center on the Sun. The storm cloud rushed out from the Sun at a million miles an hour, and on the evening of Monday, March 13 it struck the Earth. Alaskan and Scandinavian observers were treated to a spectacular auroral display that night. Intense colors from the rare Great Aurora painted the skies around the world in vivid shapes that moved like legendary dragons. Ghostly celestial armies battled from sunset to midnight. Newspapers that reported this event considered the aurora, itself, to be the most newsworthy aspect of the storm. Seen as far south as Florida and Cuba, the vast majority of people in the Northern Hemisphere had never seen such a spectacle. Some even worried that a nuclear first-strike might be in progress.

…Millions marveled at the beautiful celestial spectacle, and solar physicists delighted in the new data it brought to them, but many more were not so happy about it.

Silently, the storm had impacted the magnetic field of the Earth and caused a powerful jet stream of current to flow 1000 miles above the ground. Like a drunken serpent, its coils gyrated and swooped downwards in latitude, deep into North America. As midnight came and went, invisible electromagnetic forces were staging their own pitched battle in a vast arena bounded by the sky above and the rocky subterranean reaches of the Earth. A river of charged particles and electrons in the ionosphere flowed from west to east, inducing powerful electrical currents in the ground that surged into many natural nooks and crannies. There, beneath the surface, natural rock resistance murdered them quietly in the night. Nature has its own effective defenses for these currents, but human technology was not so fortunate on this particular night. The currents eventually found harbor in the electrical systems of Great Britain, the United States and Canada.

You can read on for more about how the storm spawned a power outage in Quebec and pushed US systems to the brink of collapse. If you want to totally geek out on auroral science, check this article out about how the Earth’s magnetosphere actually extends itself to block solar storms.

Greg took this shot in late February in Marquette in -17 temps! View his photo bigger and see more in his northern lights slideshow. You can purchase Greg’s pics at MichiganNaturePhotos.com.

There’s more science and much (much) more about the Northern Lights and Michigan on Michigan in Pictures.

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