Dive in before Summer 2016 is over!!

Sunset Dive

Sunset Dive, photo by Niki Collis

Can you believe that Summer 2016 is almost over?? Here’s hoping you get a chance to enjoy the last, golden moments of summer this weekend!

View Niki’s photo from Crystal Lake taken Labor Day Weekend 2009 bigger, check out more of Niki’s awesome Summer photos, and view her work at nikicollisphotography.com.

Torch Lake is pretty big

Torch Lake by James Kral

Torch Lake, photo by James Kral

I figured I should follow up Thursday’s Torch Lake photo with more about the lake that is both Michigan’s longest and deepest inland lake. Wikipedia’s Torch Lake entry says (in part):

Torch Lake at 19 miles (31 km) long is Michigan’s longest inland lake and at approximately 18,770 acres (76 km²) is Michigan’s second largest inland lake … Several villages and hamlets lie along its shore, including Alden, Eastport, Clam River, and Torch Lake. The lake is about 17 miles (27 km) northeast of Traverse City and is separated by narrow strips of land from both Grand Traverse Bay on the northwest and Elk Lake at the southwest end. The lake is about two miles (3.2 km) wide and is centered at 44°59′00″N 85°18′30″W. It has a maximum depth of 315 feet (96 m) just off the east end of Campbell Rd. (Milton Twp.) and an average depth of 111 feet (34 m), making it Michigan’s deepest inland lake. It is a popular lake for fishing, featuring lake trout, rock bass, yellow perch, smallmouth bass, muskellunge, Pike, ciscoes, brown trout, rainbow trout, and whitefish.

The name of the lake is not due to its shape, rather, is derived from translation from the Ojibwa name Was-wa-gon-ong meaning “Place of the Torches”, referring to the practice of the local Native American population who once used torches at night to attract fish for harvesting with spears and nets. For a time it was referred to by local European settlers as “Torch Light Lake”, which eventually was shortened to its current name.

View James’ photo background bigtacular and see more in his slideshow.

More Michigan lakes and more summer wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

#TBT Idle Moments on Torch Lake

Idle Moments on Torch Lake

Idle Moments – Torch Lake, photo courtesy Don Harrison/UpNorth Memories

I think the woman on the right is really glad that cell phones hadn’t been invented yet.

View Don’s photo background big, check out his slideshow, and definitely follow UpNorth Memories on Facebook!

More Throwback Thursdays and more funny business on Michigan in Pictures!

Glory Lake Sunrise and Kettle Lakes

Glory Lake Sunrise

wGlory sunrise 1, photo by Jeff Caverly

The Michigan DNR’s page on Bright and Glory Lakes near Grayling includes maps. They say that both lakes have floating piers & boat launches for fishing – species include largemouth bass, rainbow trout, smallmouth bass, sucker, sunfish, yellow perch:

These lakes are called Kettle Lakes as they are shaped like tea kettles. They are roundish and deep in the center (more than 40 feet). The lake bottom is marl, so wading and swimming are prohibited as people would sink in the marl.

Here’s more about Kettle Lakes from MSU’s Geology department:

Kettles are depressions left behind after partially-buried ice blocks melt. Many are filled with water, and are then called “kettle lakes”. Most lakes in Michigan could be described as kettle lakes, and the term “kettle lake” describes the way the lake basin was formed. Kettle lake basins were formed as the glaciers receded. While this was happening, a block of ice broke off the glacier, and just sat there. As the glacier continued to melt, the debris from the glacier (soil, rocks, stones, gravel, etc.) filled in around the block of ice. When the block of ice finally melted, all the debris surrounding it fell into the hole, creating the kettle type basin, which when filled with water, became a lake as we know it.

Many of our small, deep lakes in Michigan are kettle lakes. Some have since been infilled with vegetation and plant matter, to form bogs. Even some of our larger, deep lakes, like Higgins Lake and Walled Lake, are kettles.

View Jeff’s photo background big, see more including another view of the sunrise in his slideshow, and follow Jeff Caverly Photography on Facebook.

Evening clouds after rain

Evening Clouds After Rain

Evening clouds after rain, photo by Anne Fisher

Ann says she never tires of Bass Lake in the Upper Peninsula near Gwinn. I can see why! View her photo background big and see more in her 2016 UP slideshow.

More summer wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures and here’s a link to a map of Bass Lake.

 

North Bar Lake in Sleeping Bear Dunes

North Bar Lake Sleeping Bear Dunes

North Bar Lake, Sleeping Bear Dunes, photo by jdehmel

The Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore pages on North Bar Lake and the North Bar Lake Overlook say (in part):

The small lake below is North Bar Lake. The name describes how the lake formed: it is ponded behind a sand bar. At times, the sand bar builds up and separates North Bar Lake from Lake Michigan. At other times, a small connecting channel exists between the two lakes. North Bar Lake occupies part of a former bay on Lake Michigan. This ancient bay was flanked by headlands on both sides: Empire Bluffs on the south and Sleeping Bear Bluffs on the north. Shorelines have a natural tendency to become straighter with time. Wave action focuses on the headlands and wears them back, while shoreline currents carry sediment to the quiet bays and fill them in. Deeper parts of the bay are often left as lakes when sand fills in the shallower parts. The same process that formed North Bar Lake also formed many of the other lakes in northern Michigan: Glen, Crystal, Elk and Torch Lakes, for example.

…North Bar Lake is one of the most popular beaches in the Lakeshore because it has shallow, clear water over a sandy bottom makes for warmer swim than in Lake Michigan. But for those who like the refreshing cool water and wave action of the big lake, you can walk across the low dunes that separate the two lakes in just a couple of minutes. The beaches of pure sand and the small outlet to Lake Michigan is ideal for the kids to play.

View jdehmel’s photo background bigilicious and see more in his Sleeping Bear Dunes slideshow.

More dunes and more summer wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

Sailor’s Delight on Crispell Lake

Sailors Delight

Sailor’s Delight, photo by Maury Page

Maury shares:

This photo was taken at Crispell Lake in Clarklake, MI on a calm, summer evening. I couldn’t capture the sun rays from where I was standing, so it seemed like a perfect opportunity to get out my new drone. There were only a couple boats on the lake and it was a nice quiet night. When I was capturing this scene it just so happened that a bird flew into the frame at the perfect moment.

Regarding Crispell Lake, Lake Link says:

Crispell Lake is located in Jackson County, Michigan. This lake is 82 acres in size. It is approximately 25 feet deep at its deepest point. Anglers can expect to catch a variety of fish including Black Crappie, Bluegill, Brown Trout, Grass Pickerel, Largemouth Bass, Sunfish, Walleye and Yellow Perch.

View Maury’s photo bigger,  check out more on his Instagram at mopage19 and also on his website.

More lakes on Michigan in Pictures.