Chasing Fall

Aubrieta at Cloud Peak

Aubrieta Hope at Cloud Peak, photo by Michigan Nut Photography

Aubrieta Hope shared this feature from the Pure Michigan blog about six photographers chasing UP fall color that includes three Michigan in Pictures regulars – Neil Weaver, Craig Sterkin & John McCormick. It begins:

Once upon a time, six shooters ventured north to the Tripod Forest, a fabled land of brilliant fall color in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. All were packing: most brought Nikon’s, but two carried Canons. They loaded up minivans, SUV’s and 4×4′s, bringing filters and flashlights, bug spray, raingear, ice scrapers, and backpacks. About half of them planned to find a campsite someplace and the others made hotel reservations. Some had never met, but were destined to. A few of them hoped to cross paths up there somewhere.

It was late September and their only plan was to find and follow the color. Frost was in the forecast. The time was now. The 2014 Michigan Fall Foliage Convention had begun!

Click for more including photos of these folks in action!

View Aubrieta’s photo bigger at the Pure Michigan Blog and see her photography at michiganscenery.com. You can also check out the other photographers at Neil Weaver Photography, John McCormick’s Michigan Nut PhotographyCraig Sterken Photography, Phil Stagg’s MI Falls and Kenneth Keifer Photography.

Presque Isle Fog

Presque Isle Fog by Mark Obrien

Presque Isle Fog, photo by Mark O’Brien

On Thursday October 16 from 6-8 pm, Mark’s show of black and white prints opens at the Argus Museum at 525 West William Street in Ann Arbor. The show runs through December 5th, and the museum is open 9-5 weekdays.

View Mark’s photo bigger and see more in his Recent monochrome work slideshow.

PS: There’s a nice feature on the Argus Museum on Michigan in Pictures that features one of Mark’s photos!

Farewell Robin Williams

Robin Williams

Robin Williams, photo by Gene Schilling

“Comedy is acting out optimism.”
~Robin Williams

Like many who have enjoyed the zany & genuine wit of Robin Williams, I was saddened to hear that he lost his lifelong battle with depression.

View Gene’s photo bigger, see more from this show in his Robin Williams @ The Sound Board, Detroit, MI (assignment for MotorCityBlog.net) slideshow and check out musicimagesbygene.com for some great concert photography.

PS: I found this quote in a Huffington Post article with some really great shots of Williams.

Ice Caves of Leelanau: The Book

Lake Michigan ... ice cave sunset

Lake Michigan … ice cave sunset, photo by Ken Scott

Last winter some incredible ice formations piled up off the coast of the Leelanau Peninsula, and the photographer on the scene was my friend & Michigan in Pictures regular Ken Scott. Ken has published a book, Ice Caves of Leelanau, that features some of his best shots and essays by noted Michigan author Jerry Dennis. Right now his books are mostly sold out (reprint coming in July) but you might be able to sweet talk one out of Ken – email him here.

If you’re in northwest Lower Michigan you can catch Ken’s talk on the ice caves tomorrow from 4-6 PM at the Leland Township Library.

View the photo bigger on Flickr and see more in his Lake Michigan Ice & Caves slideshow. You can also see some videos of the Ice Caves on Ken’s site!

Michigan Nut’s 2015 Calendar

Moonlit-on-the-Mighty-Mac

Moonlit on the Mighty Mac, photo by John McCormick/Michigan Nut Photography

If you’ve been following Michigan in Pictures for any length of time, you’re probably familiar with the work of John McCormick aka Michigan Nut.

John has just released his 2015 Michigan Wild & Scenic Wall Calendar, and you can get it for just $15. As an added bonus, if you head over to like his post about it on Facebook, you have a chance to win a free one!

The photo above of the Mackinac Bridge is not only the cover of the calendar, it’s also the photo for June. View (and purchase) John’s photo bigger at MichiganNutPhotography.com, see more in his Michigan Bridges Gallery and definitely follow Michigan Nut Photography on Facebook for a regular dose of photographic awesome from the Great Lakes State!

There’s lots more from John on Michigan in Pictures too!!

 

How to see the Northern Lights in Michigan

October Auroras by Shawn Malone

October Auroras by Shawn Malone/Lake Superior Photo

Just in! Shawn told me she just got in from shooting the northern lights last night – check her photo out right here and stay tuned to her Facebook for updates!

NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center reported this morning:

Earth is currently under the influence of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and G2 (Moderate) geomagnetic storming has been observed. This is likely the result of what was expected to be a near miss from an event originally observed on the 14th. This CME has a fairly well-organized magnetic field structure so continued G1 (Minor) to G2 (Moderate) storming is certainly possible. Stay tuned for updates as this event unfolds.

The Aurora Borealis was out last night, and I thought it a good time to share Shawn Malone’s Insider Secrets for Northern Lights that she wrote for the Pure Michigan Blog a couple of months ago:

Michigan has a lot of things going for it when it comes to northern lights viewing, the most important being 1). latitude  and 2). relatively low light pollution in many areas.  Northern Michigan sits in a great location latitude-wise, as the auroral oval dips further south on nights of stronger auroral activity.  The Upper Peninsula  is blessed with hundreds of miles of shoreline along the south shore of Lake Superior, which provides some of the best northern lights viewing in the lower 48 due to the very dark night skies.  When looking north over Lake Superior, one can see right down to the horizon and take in a 180 degree unobstructed view of the night sky.  Getting to a location without the obstruction of a treeline or hills is important at our latitude, as many times an auroral display will sit very low on the horizon. Having a dark night sky with little light pollution is necessary when looking for the northern lights, as the light of the aurora is equal to the brightness of starlight.

People often ask me how I’ve been able to see so many northern lights displays over the years and a lot of it has to do with what I mentioned above. I live in Marquette, Michigan which sits centered on the south shore of Lake Superior, and when looking north there’s nothing but lake for hundreds of miles. Marquette and locations nearby have many areas along the lakeshore still publicly accessible, allowing for the opportunity to view the aurora right from the shoreline.

If you’ve never seen the northern lights and want to maximize your opportunity to do so, learn and pay attention to sunspot activity, as that’s what drives the northern lights.

Read on for tips on where to catch these lights, some more photos from Shawn and her incredible, Smithsonian award-winning video Radiance.

View Shawn’s photo bigger on Facebook, follow her Lake Superior Photo page and if you get up to Marquette, check out the Lake Superior Photo Gallery on Front St in downtown Marquette!

Michigan in Pictures has a TON of Northern Lights information & photos that includes the science and stories of this incredible phenomenon.

Grace Dickinson & Leelanau County’s Female Photographers

WomenPhotographers-GraceDickinson-SteamerMissouri

Steamer “Missouri” docked in Leland in 1919, photo by unknown, hand colored by Dickinson Photography

This week’s Glen Arbor Sun has a terrific feature by my friend Kathleen Stocking on Six Leelanau County Women Photographers. She profiles Barbara Nowinski, Kathleen (Dodge) Buhler, Meggen Watt Peterson, Ashmir McCarthy, Marty Schilling and Grace Dickinson. Here’s Grace:

Grace Dickinson has a photo studio across the road from the place her grandparents first came to on the south shore of Little Glen Lake in the summer of 1912. Her grandparents traveled to the Leelanau Peninsula by steamer, from the Navy Pier in Chicago up Lake Michigan to Glen Haven. In 1942 her parents met and fell in love while her mother was a writer/editor at the Leelanau Enterprise and soon after became year-round residents. Grace’s father, Fred, a broker who worked from home, spent his free time photographing the dunes and the islands. One unusual photo shows a cloud the exact size of one of the Manitou Islands, above the island, a rare phenomenon caused by condensation when the temperature of the island is colder than that of the surrounding waters of Lake Michigan.

From an early age, Grace followed in her father’s footsteps, quite literally, accompanying him and sometimes photographing the same scenes. Grace left her studies at Northwestern Michigan College to go on a year-long sailing adventure in the Bahamas, and followed this with a two-decade-sojourn out in Montana where she married a rancher and finished college. Grace returned to the Leelanau Peninsula in the late 1980s and became a mapmaker for the Leelanau County Planning Commission. She began taking photos of the Leelanau Peninsula and opened her own studio out of which she sold her own and her father’s photos and maps. In the mid-1990s she revived the 1930s art of photographic hand-coloring, laboriously hand-tinting her father’s black and white photos of earlier years, photos which evoke the shadows and starkness of some of the photos of Diane Arbus, but as applied to nature, not people. In the medium of hand-coloring Grace discovered a way to keep her father’s legacy alive and express her own love of Leelanau. Her photo studio is on Glenmere (M-22) west of the bridge over the Glen Lake Narrows.

Head over to the Glen Arbor Sun for more! The photo above is labeled as having been taken in Glen Arbor in 1909, but former Leelanau Historical Museum Director Laura Quackenbush identified it as Leland’s dock. The photo was hand-colored by Grace from an old negative on glass found in the Leelanau Enterprise office during the time her parents (briefly) owned it.

If you’re interested in more work bu Grace and her father, head over to Dickinson Photography. I’ve also featured several photos from Fred Dickinson on Michigan in Pictures, and you can click that link to read a little about the coloring process.

George’s Eagle Harbor Web

November 11 2008 Walkabout, photo by George Hite

“To Serve”, that’s the whole idea. Other Web sites set forth the natural, cultural and historic wonders of this special place for all to see. This site is designed to respond to more basic needs of those who live here — like what’s going on and, more importantly, the desire we all have for the delight and support of “neighborhood”.
~George Hite, November 1996

Last November 1, George Hite of Eagle Harbor passed away at his home at the age of 80. His memorial service is planned forJuly 28, 2012 and I thought it would be good to post one of his photos to remember one of the early pioneers of blogging in Michigan.

I first became aware of George’s Eagle Harbor Web in 1997 when looking for information about Eagle Harbor and the Keweenaw Peninsula. Over the years and along with many others, I followed life in the small town of Eagle Harbor through his photos and updates about longtime residents, new arrivals and the changing seasons. I hope you get a chance to take a moment to shuffle through his photos and writing and reflect upon a man who spent a lot of his life in service to his neighbors.

Farewell George.

Detroit Studio Collective Grand Opening

The Fog

The Fog, photo by E.Peoples

The Detroit Studio Collective is holding their Grand Opening this Saturday (May 7) from noon to 10 PM (location). The photographers (some of whom have been featured on Michigan in Pictures) are Bobby Alcott, Rebecca Gutierrez, Kellie Saunders, Rob Terwilliger, Josh Willerton and Eric Peoples.

Check Eric’s photo out bigger and in his Greatest Hits slideshow.

Kent Lake in Kensington Metropark … and a photowalk

Panorama Kent Lake

Panorama Kent Lake, photo by ansonredford

In the Absolute Michigan pool on Flickr, Charles posted an announcement of a spring photo walk taking place this Saturday (April 16) at Kensington Metro Park in Milford:

The walk is hosted by Southeast Michigan Digital Photography group and will take place on the Kensington nature trails with a raffle and optional lunch afterwards. Spring is a beautiful time of year for local photographers to enjoy photography together. The event is free though a permit is required to enter the park, permit prices can be found in the event details at Southeast Michigan Digital Photography or at our Facebook group site.

I have hazy but fond memories of my grandmother taking me here to feed the carp Ritz crackers when I was little. The Huron-Clinton Metroparks page on Kensington Metropark says:

Kensington’s 4,481 sprawling acres of wooded, hilly terrain surrounds beautiful Kent Lake, and is home to an abundance of wildlife and waterfowl. Kensington Metropark offers a multitude of recreational activities throughout the year, from biking and boating to cross-country skiing and tobogganing. In addition to striking sunrises and sunsets, 1,200-acre Kent Lake offers plenty of fun activities: swim at Martindale or Maple beaches, get soaked at the Splash ‘n’ Blast, or just spend the day fishing, boating or picnicking along the water. Take a tour of the lake aboard the Island Queen II in the summer and fall. Or, enjoy a winter day ice-fishing or skating on frozen lake waters.

This first-class recreational area also features an 18-hole regulation golf course, 27-hole disc course, nature center, farm center, beautiful picnic areas and scenic hiking and biking trails for hours of enjoyment. With two and a half million visitors every year Kensington Metropark is a favorite place to enjoy Michigan’s natural treasures.

Donald took this photo a couple of weeks ago. Check it out background big and see a lot more photos in his Kensington Metro Park slideshow!

There’s even more photos that show the diversity of wildlife and scenery in this slideshow from the Absolute Michigan group!