What’s in a name: Petoskey Stone Edition

petoskey-stone-on-the-lake-michigan-waterline

Waterline, photo by Andrew McFarlane

This is one of my photos that I dug up for another project that I wanted to share. Apparently this was taken during in my “tilty” phase. ;)

Here’s something beautiful that a young woman I know named Rose Petoskey wrote about Petoskey stones several years ago.

My name is Noozeen (Rose) Nimkiins (Little Thunder) Petoskey (Rising Sun) and I am Anishinaabek.

Many people would associate the word Petoskey with the souvenir stone found on the northern Lake Michigan shorelines. However, to my family, the word Petoskey represents much more than a souvenir.

In the Odawa language, the word Petoskey (Bii-daa-si-ga) means the rising sun, the day’s first light, or the sun’s first rays moving across the water. The Petoskey stone is a fossilized coral created by impressions made in limestone during the last Michigan ice age. These stones were named “Petoskey” because the impressions resembled the rising sun coming up over the water. Just as the image of the rising sun is implanted within the Petoskey stone, the archaeology of a person’s names is implanted within. All names within our Anishinaabek culture reflect an individual’s personal history. Rocks go deep, but names go much deeper to reveal the stories of the past.

Read on for more of Rose’s thoughts the power and beauty of the Odawa language!

View my photo from 9 years ago background bigilicious and see more in my Leland, Michigan slideshow.

More summer wallpaper and more from the beach on Michigan in Pictures

PS: The other project was for a stone path that a friend is building this year at the Earthwork Harvest Gathering held next weekend near Lake City (September 16-18). It’s a wonderful festival packed with Michigan musicians!

Grand Haven Pierfolk

pierfolk-by-jamie-mcdonald

Pierfolk, photo by Jamie MacDonald

View Jamie’s photo of the Grand Haven Pier bigger, see more in his Buildings and Structures slideshow, and view & purchase his work at jmacdonaldphoto.com.

Paddling Home

paddling home

paddling home, photo by Amy

Well, I hope that you had a wonderful weekend, and that if you traveled you are either still on vacation or had as enjoyable a return trip as this fellow.

View Amy’s photo background bigalicious and see more in her slideshow.

More summer wallpaper and more Great Lakes on Michigan in Pictures.

Dive in before Summer 2016 is over!!

Sunset Dive

Sunset Dive, photo by Niki Collis

Can you believe that Summer 2016 is almost over?? Here’s hoping you get a chance to enjoy the last, golden moments of summer this weekend!

View Niki’s photo from Crystal Lake taken Labor Day Weekend 2009 bigger, check out more of Niki’s awesome Summer photos, and view her work at nikicollisphotography.com.

Northern Lights and a Proton Arc!

Milky Way, A Proton Arc, and the Northern Lights

The Milky Way, A Proton Arc, and the Northern Lights!, photo by Eric Hackney

Last night I got a couple of texts that the northern lights were out. By the time I got to the beach here in northern lower Michigan, they had died back to a soft arc on the horizon. Up on the Keweenaw however, they were pretty spectacular!

In addition to being spectacular, Eric’s photos introduced me to a new northern lights term, the mysterious proton arc or proton aurora. which NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day explains in this link filled post (picture is below):

What are auroras made out of? Triggered by solar activity, normal auroras are caused by collisions between fast-moving electrons and the oxygen and nitrogen in Earth’s upper atmosphere. The electrons come from the magnetosphere, the region of space controlled by Earth’s magnetic field. As the excited oxygen and nitrogen molecules return to their low energy state, they emit light, seen as the auroral glow.

Sometimes, however, auroras can be caused by collisions with heavier protons, causing a more energetic display with strong ultraviolet emission. In addition, protons can temporarily capture an electron and emit light for themselves. Such a proton aurora is seen above, recorded by the IMAGE satellite. A special feature is the bright spot near picture center, embedded in a ring of auroral emission around the north magnetic pole of planet Earth.

Most solar wind protons never reach the Earth to cause auroras because they are completely deflected away at a great distance by the Earth’s magnetic field. The bright spot in the auroral ring indicates a particularly deep crack in the Earth’s magnetic field where protons were able to flow along a temporarily connected region between the Sun and the Earth, relatively undeflected, until they impacted the Earth’s ionosphere.

Read on for lots more. The good news? It looks like the wide coronal hole that was responsible for last night’s aurora will continue to kick out the celestial jams for a couple of days, meaning this weekend offers a great chance to see the northern lights in Michigan!

View Eric’s photo bigger and see more in his 9-1-16: Northern Lights IX slideshow.

Much more about the northern lights / aurora borealis on Michigan in Pictures!

Photo courtesy NASA:

Proton Arc Nasa

50 Shades of Blue

50 Shades of Blue

50 Shades of Blue, photo by John Hill Photography

A simply gorgeous shot of Au Sable Point and the Au Sable Light Station in the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore.

View this photo background big on Twitter and definitely follow John on Instagram!

Scenic vista at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

Scenic vista at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

Scenic vista at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, photo by Craig Sterken Photography

Craig writes “My wife and I hiked in the Beaver Basin area for the first time and discovered our new favorite hike. What a great place to swim after walking through the woods in 87 degree weather!

Can’t see how it could get much better!! View Craig’s photo bigger on Facebook and view & purchase his work at craigsterken.com.