Good morning from Bond Falls

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Good morning from Bond Falls….Burrrrr, photo by Joe Garza

View Joe’s photo bigger and see more at JMG Photography on Facebook.

More Bond Falls on Michigan in Pictures.

Super Color Tree

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Super Color Tree, photo by Scottie Williford

If you’d like to try this at home, the recipe is: 590nm infrared, f/11 @1/125, iso 200

Here’s hoping you can catch some more fall color this weekend – looks like a great forecast!!

View Scottie’s photo bigger, see more in his slideshow, and be sure to follow Scottie Photography on Facebook.

Lake Charlevoix Fall Colors

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Lake Charlevoix Fall Colors, photo by frank wulfers

Frank took this shot on Wednesday from the Avalanche Mountain Scenic Overlook in Boyne City. As you can see, this will be the weekend for fall color across much of Michigan, so check out some great fall scenes on Michigan in Pictures and make your plans for a getaway!

View Frank’s photo bigger and see more in his Michigan – Northwest slideshow.

Friday Fall Color Update from the High Rollways

 

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High Roll Away, photo by Charles Bonham

“Of all the places I’ve worked here in Michigan, this is my favorite place to collect my senses, do a little meditating and get rid of my problems. It’s like a soothing balm.”
-Ray Westbrook, retired DNR on the High Roll-Away

Charles took this yesterday at the Buckley High Roll-Away overlooking the Manistee River, and it shows how autumn color continues to lag a bit behind in northern lower Michigan. mLive posted some satellite pics of fall color from NASA’s Aqua satellite earlier this week that give you a look at how things are shaping up. If you’re thinking about a jaunt, Pure Michigan’s fall color tours provide some pre-planned ideas all over the state. To get current fall color, I usually find it best to pick your location and call their chamber or visitor’s bureau. The bigger ones in Traverse City, Petoskey, Marquette, Grand Rapids, and elsewhere will often have a good idea about a large range.

MyNorth’s Jeff Smith has a great story on Buckley’s Big View that says in part:

Like any notable landmark without an official name, this one goes by several aliases—Horseshoe Bend Overlook, Lookout Point or the Highbanks Overlook—not to mention spelling variations. Depends who you ask.

Stand atop the Roll-Away and the scenery is for certain. From the lookout it’s 200 feet down, and before you the valley curls up like a vast bowl, taking in a viewscape of almost 130 square miles of dense pine and hardwood forest. The bowl’s rim, a ridge, runs roughly from Manton in the east, around to Meauwataka and Harrietta in the south (you’ll see the distant radio towers), and on the west to Mesick.

Here, more than a century ago, the expanse of treetops inspired awe among those who saw wealth in the more than 1.2 billion board feet of lumber in the upper Manistee River basin. Surveying the area in 1869 for the Manistee River Improvement Company, A.S. Wordsworth wrote, “This river is the great highway that penetrates the vast pine region of Manistee. … It is without doubt the best logging stream in the world, and all along its circuitous path, reaching far away, it seems to bear mute testimony to the wonderful wisdom of the Creator.”

Read on for lots more and here’s the map on Waymarking!

You can get Charles’ photo background bigtacular and see more in his slideshow.

Lots more fall color and fall wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures!

 

Michigan Fall Color Running Late in 2016?

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Autumn Tree Tunnel on M-22, photo by Owen Weber

The Detroit News is reporting that Michigan’s leaves are about a week late this year:

“The warm, dry summer has delayed things,” said meteorologist Jim Keysor of the Gaylord office of the National Weather Service. “ “People will just have to wait. Colder nights are coming and the color show will happen.”

“We’re a week to 10 days behind,” he estimated.

The National Weather Service recorded plenty of 90-degree days through August — five in June, nine in July and seven in August.

“We’re probably at 40 percent to 60 percent right now,” said accounting assistant Gina Penegor of the Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park in Ontonagon of the Upper Peninsula. “We’ve had a light frost and this weekend could be the best time to view color here. In the last five days it’s really changed a lot.”

…“By all accounts, the color is coming a little bit later with all the great weather we’ve been having,” said Michelle Grinnell, the public relations manager of Travel Michigan, in a statement. “That extends our fall travel season.”

Grinnell said that the fall tourism season is expected to have a $3.7 billion economic impact on Michigan in 2016. Michigan has 19 million acres of woodlands. The golds, yellows and reds of autumn usually begin in mid-September and work their way south from Lake Superior, peaking in late October in the lower counties along the Indiana and Ohio borders.

You can read on for more. While I will say that the eyeball test agrees the colors are running behind around Traverse City, consider this article that maintains the timing of fall color is due mainly to the length of days and as such, unchanged year to year.

As a further piece of evidence, Owen took this photo of peak color on M-22 last year on October 21st about a week to 10 days from now. View it bigger and see more in his Michigan slideshow, and learn more about Owen at owenweberlive.com.

PS: This was taken on M-22 right in front of the house I grew up in about 2 miles south of Leland on the way to Glen Arbor & Sleeping Bear Dunes! While those trees are definitely fading under the twin ravages of time and the power company/road commission, it’s still a pretty spectacular spot!

Set Adrift on Memory Bliss

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Set Adrift On Memory Bliss, photo by Robert Michaud

View Robert’s photo bigger, see more in his slideshow, and view & purchase photos on his photography website.

PS: PM Dawn? Don’t mind if I do!

The science behind the magic: Fall color explained

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Untitled, photo by Scottie

The Science of Color in Autumn Leaves from the United States National Arboretum is such an excellent explanation of the science behind the magic of Michigan’s fall color show that I try and share it every year:

The process that starts the cascade of events that result in fall color is actually a growth process. In late summer or early autumn, the days begin to get shorter, and nights are longer. Like most plants, deciduous trees and shrubs are rather sensitive to length of the dark period each day. When nights reach a threshold value and are long enough, the cells near the juncture of the leaf and the stem divide rapidly, but they do not expand. This abscission layer is a corky layer of cells that slowly begins to block transport of materials such as carbohydrates from the leaf to the branch. It also blocks the flow of minerals from the roots into the leaves. Because the starting time of the whole process is dependent on night length, fall colors appear at about the same time each year in a given location, whether temperatures are cooler or warmer than normal.

During the growing season, chlorophyll is replaced constantly in the leaves. Chlorophyll breaks down with exposure to light in the same way that colored paper fades in sunlight. The leaves must manufacture new chlorophyll to replace chlorophyll that is lost in this way. In autumn, when the connection between the leaf and the rest of the plant begins to be blocked off, the production of chlorophyll slows and then stops. In a relatively short time period, the chlorophyll disappears completely.

This is when autumn colors are revealed. Chlorophyll normally masks the yellow pigments known as xanthophylls and the orange pigments called carotenoids — both then become visible when the green chlorophyll is gone. These colors are present in the leaf throughout the growing season. Red and purple pigments come from anthocyanins. In the fall anthocyanins are manufactured from the sugars that are trapped in the leaf. In most plants anthocyanins are typically not present during the growing season.

As autumn progresses, the cells in the abscission layer become more dry and corky. The connections between cells become weakened, and the leaves break off with time. Many trees and shrubs lose their leaves when they are still very colorful. Some plants retain a great deal of their foliage through much of the winter, but the leaves do not retain their color for long. Like chlorophyll, the other pigments eventually break down in light or when they are frozen. The only pigments that remain are tannins, which are brown.

The explain that because the starting time of the whole process is dependent on night length, fall colors appear at more or less the same time every year and are not overly dependent on temperature, rainfall or other factors, other than the fact that weather can shorten or prolong the show by stripping leaves from trees.

Click through to the US Arboretum for more and also see Fall & Fuit from the Science of Color!

View Scotties’ photo bigger and see more in his Infrared slideshow.

Tons more fall photos on Michigan in Pictures!