Fantastic Friday: Tahquamenon Falls, take two

I had no idea on Wednesday that we’d be back at Tahquamenon Falls so soon. I guess I have to add a safety warning that if you’re not a crazy amazing kayaking legend like Marcelo Galizio, you probably shouldn’t do this. Also it might be illegal. Also if you tell me I shouldn’t post photos like this, I will probably tell you you shouldn’t follow my blog because I am 100% in favor of people being amazing.

Tahquamenon Falls revisited with Marcelo Galizio

Tahquamenon Falls revisited, photo by Aerial Vantage Productions

Here’s an aerial photo of Marcelo Galizio’s drop over Tahquamenon Falls yesterday!!  Look for a link to a video soon in the comments or at Aerial Vantage Productions on Facebook. Also be sure to check out their work at and follow Dan Englund on Instagram!

Because this is so awesome, and also because I learned about it through Gary Ennis, here’s another photo from Marcelo’s Tahquamenon Falls adventure:

Into the Falls Marcelo Galizio a

Be sure to click to check out Gary’s photos of Marcelo’s entire drop!

Autumn Squared: Fall Color at Tahquamenon Falls

Tahquamenon Falls fall 2015

Tahquamenon Falls, Luce County, Michigan, photo by twurdemann

We’ll return to the fall color farewell tour with a photo from Michigan’s largest waterfall, Tahquamenon Falls (pronounced as spelled – tah-qua-me-non). It’s located in Tahquamenon Falls State Park which:

…encompasses close to 50,000 acres stretching over 13 miles. Most of this is undeveloped woodland without roads, buildings or power lines. The centerpiece of the park, and the very reason for its existence, is the Tahquamenon River with its waterfalls. The Upper Falls is one the largest waterfalls east of the Mississippi. It has a drop of nearly 50 feet and is more than 200 feet across. A maximum flow of more than 50,000 gallons of water per second has been recorded cascading over these falls. Four miles downstream is the Lower Falls, a series of five smaller falls cascading around an island. Although not as dramatic as the Upper Falls, they are equally magnificent. The falls can be viewed from the river bank or from the island, which can be reached by rowboat rented from a park concession. The island walk affords a view of the falls in the south channel.
This is the land of Longfellow’s Hiawatha – “by the rushing Tahquamenaw” Hiawatha built his canoe. Long before the white man set eyes on the river, the abundance of fish in its waters and animals along its shores attracted the Ojibwa Indians, who camped, farmed, fished and trapped along its banks. In the late 1800’s came the lumber barons and the river carried their logs by the millions to the mills. Lumberjacks, who harvested the tall timber, were among the first permanent white settlers in the area.

Rising from springs north of McMillan, the Tahquamenon River drains the watershed of an area of more than 790 square miles. From its source, it meanders 94 miles before emptying into Whitefish Bay. The amber color of the water is caused by tannins leached from the Cedar, Spruce and Hemlock in the swamps drained by the river. The extremely soft water churned by the action of the falls causes the large amounts of foam, which has been the trademark of the Tahquamenon since the days of the voyager.

Read on for more and maps & camping information. I’ll add that November through April are great months to visit Tahquamenon Falls – very few people!

twurdemann shares that this view of the the Upper Tahquamenon Falls was a three second exposure with a B+W ND106 six stop solid neutral density filter on a Fuji XT1 + XF 55-200mm. View it bigger and see more in his Waterfalls slideshow.

Lots more fall color and waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures!

Waterfall Wednesday: Catching Fire at O Kun de Kun Falls

O Kun de Kun Falls falls on the Baltimore River

O Kun de Kun Falls, photo by Tom Mortenson

GoWaterfalling’s page on the O Kun de Kun Falls says in part:

O Kun de Kun Falls is one of the largest of the waterfalls in Ontanagon county. It is not as large as Bond Falls or Agate Falls, but it is just as scenic and far wilder. It is a mile plus hike to O Kun de Kun Falls and there are no fences or signs. The waterfall is also unusual in that it is an actual plunge falls. Only a handful of the many waterfalls around Lake Superior are plunge falls. You can go behind the falls if you want, but you need to be careful and sure footed.

Read on for more including directions. You can also check out the Ottawa National Forest page on O Kun de Kun Falls for a satellite map of the area.

If you’re wondering about the name of the falls, it was after a famous chief, Kun de Kun meaning “To Keep Up the Net” from the Leach Lake band of Ottawa. Here’s a picture of him!

Last Tuesday Tom took us to Bond Falls, and he returns this morning with a shot from O Kun de Kun showing that fall color is finally kicking off! View it background big and view lots more of his waterfall photos on Flickr.

More fall wallpaper and more waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

Bond Falls in Autumn

Bond Falls in Autumn

Bond Falls in Autumn, photo by Tom Mortenson

Here’s the latest cover photo for Michigan in Pictures, one of many in the Michigan Cover Photos group on Flickr!

It’s from early October of 2013, and while it looks like our color season could be pretty darned good, it’s probably a little late this year. Via the Freep, it looks like the recent run of “Indian summer” is pushing color back:

The Upper Peninsula, which usually has plenty of fall color by this time in September, is still lolling around in green, reports Pure Michigan and the Foliage Network, which monitor fall color in the state.The very western Upper Peninsula as of Thursday was showing between 12% to 30% color, but the rest of the state had none.

Things seem to be about two weeks or more behind schedule.

Still, “cooler weather has taken hold and should help to get things going,” reports Market Rzonca, who runs The Foliage Network.

Pure Michigan’s fall color blog ( predicted that peak fall color in the U.P., including Mackinac Island, is not expected to hit for about three weeks. Same with Alpena, Charlevoix and Ludington. Farther south, the show will come even later.

View Tom’s photo background bigtacular and check out more of Tom’s Michigan waterfall photos.

There’s more fall wallpaper, more about fall color, and more on Bond Falls on Michigan in Pictures.


Waterfall Wednesday: Wyandotte Falls on the Misery River

Wyandotte Falls Upper Peninsula

Wyandotte Falls, photo by David Hedquist

Waterfalls of the Keweenaw has this to say about Wyandotte Falls on the Misery River:

Misery River drains Lake Roland and Gerald (aka the Twin Lakes) westwards out to Lake Superior, passing over the small Wyandotte Falls along an otherwise twisted and swampy route. This waterfall is just downstream of a set of ponds next to a small set of cabins and the Wyandotte Hills Golf Course. Nestled in an older grouping of huge cedar trees and surrounded by smooth, moss-covered rocks, this waterfall seems ancient compared to the nearby golf course and state park. Also, due to the twin lakes upstream, Wyandotte Falls is susceptible to a rather large influx of spring melt.

You can click for more including photos and a map.

View David’s photo background big and see more in his Wyandotte Falls slideshow.

Many (many) more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

Way above the Mighty Mac

Mackinac Bridge from Above

The Mackinac Bridge, photo by FotoLense

Well while we’re up in the air (see yesterday) why not stay there?

View this photo background bigtacular and see more including some more aerials from the area in FotoLense’s Mackinac Island July 2013 slideshow.

There’s some great facts about the Mackinac Bridge if you click the photo and a ton more on the Mighty Mac from Michigan in Pictures!

Waterfall Wednesday: Big Pup Falls

Big Pup Falls

Big Pup, photo by Kim Nixon

Travel Marquette shares:

Big Pup Creek Falls (Lat. N46 Degrees 42′ 42″ Long W87 Degrees 42′ 14″) is located from Marquette – Travel County Road 550 north toward Big Bay approximately 23 miles to County Road 510. Travel about 7 miles (you will cross the steel bridge which spans the Yellow Dog River as directed for Yellow Dog (River) Falls). Drive approximately 2 miles farther on the winding road. Just before the bridge about 60 yard. Park safely off to the side of the road before the bridge. Walk down the hill off the road right of way to the falls.

View Kim’s photo bigger, see more in her September 2012 slideshow and follow her at Photography with Kim on Facebook.

FYI, there’s now 134 waterfall posts on Michigan in Pictures!