Broken Barn and the Galaxy

Broken Barn and the Galaxy by Jibu John

Broken Barn and the Galaxy by Jibu John

This photo is from July of 2017. See more in Jibu John’s showcase on Flickr!

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Summer Solstice Saturday in 2020

Buttercups and Barn by Jamie MacDonald

Buttercups and Barn by Jamie MacDonald

Space.com reminds us that summer will officially arrive today (Saturday, June 20) with the summer solstice at 5:43:32 PM:

At the moment of the solstice, the sun will appear to be shining directly overhead for a point on the Tropic of Cancer (latitude 23.5 degrees north) in the central Pacific Ocean, 817 miles (1,314 kilometers) east-northeast from Honolulu. With the prime exception of Hawaii, we can never see the sun directly overhead from the other 49 U.S. states, but on Saturday, at around 1 p.m. local daylight time, the sun will attain its highest point in the sky for this entire year.

Since the sun will appear to describe such a high arc across the sky, the duration of daylight in the Northern Hemisphere is now at its most extreme, in most cases lasting over 15 hours. However, contrary to popular belief, the earliest sunrise and latest sunset do not coincide with the summer solstice. The earliest sunrise actually occurred back on June 14, while the latest sunset is not due until June 27. Dawn breaks early; dusk lingers late.

More from Space.com!

Jamie took this near Eaton Rapids three years ago on the summer solstice. See more shots of this great old barn in his The Barn album on Flickr.

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I’m Still Standin’

I'm Still Standin' by Third Son

I’m Still Standin’ by Third Son

Third Son took this earlier in the week. See more in his Nikon 70-200 F/4 AF-S album on Flickr & check out more great Michigan barns on Michigan in Pictures!

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Trilliums Gone Wild

Trilliums Gone Wild by Kent Babb

Trilliums Gone Wild by Kent Babb

Michigan in Pictures is going to take a break for Memorial Day Weekend. I hope you all have a safe & enjoyable weekend!

See more of Kent’s photos on his Flickr & learn more about trillium on Michigan in Pictures.

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#TBT Green Hornet

Green Hornet by Steve

Green Hornet by Steve

Oh yeah. Here’s a throwback Thursday from way back in 2006!

See more in Steve’s Film Scans album.

Forgiveness Lives Alone

Forgiveness lives alone by Fire Fighter's Wife

Forgiveness Lives Alone by Fire Fighter’s Wife

Forgiveness lives alone and far off down the road, but bitterness and art are close, gossipy neighbors, sharing the same clothesline, hanging out their things, getting their laundry confused.
– Lorrie Moore

See more in Fire Fighter’s Wife’s Landscape gallery.

First Kiss

Let Me Have My First Kiss, photo by Julia Thomas

View this gorgeous July sunrise bigger and see more in Julia’s slideshow.

Eminant

Eminant, photo by Jamie MacDonald

View Jamie’s photo bigger and see more in his NiSi Filters slideshow.

More Michigan barns on Michigan in Pictures.

Snowy Barn

Red Barn … snowy’d, photo by Ken Scott

For all their possible danger when you’re driving too fast for the conditions, our winter roads can be lovely at the right speed!

View Ken’s photo bigger, see more in his Barns slideshow, and if you’re looking for a last-minute gift, how about his 2017 Best of the Back Pages calendar.

There’s more barns and more snow on Michigan in Pictures!

Perseid Explosion at Day Farm

Definitely watch Ken’s Perseid video at the end!

D H Day Farm ... perseid meteor shower

D H Day Farm … perseid meteor shower, photo by Ken Scott

I’ve shared this before, but Space.com has an interesting story about how the upcoming Perseid Meteor shower (peak August 11-13) came to be known as “The Tears of St. Lawrence” and also some of the science behind this annual August sky show:

Laurentius, a Christian deacon, is said to have been martyred by the Romans in 258 AD on an iron outdoor stove. It was in the midst of this torture that Laurentius cried out: “I am already roasted on one side and, if thou wouldst have me well cooked, it is time to turn me on the other.”

The saint’s death was commemorated on his feast day, Aug. 10. King Phillip II of Spain built his monastery place the “Escorial,” on the plan of the holy gridiron. And the abundance of shooting stars seen annually between approximately Aug. 8 and 14 have come to be known as St. Lawrence’s “fiery tears.”

…We know today that these meteors are actually the dross of the Swift-Tuttle comet. Discovered back in 1862, this comet takes approximately 130 years to circle the Sun. With each pass, it leaves fresh debris — mostly the size of sand grains with a few peas and marbles tossed in.

Every year during mid-August, when the Earth passes close to the orbit of Swift-Tuttle, the bits and pieces ram into our atmosphere at approximately 37 miles per second (60 kps) and create bright streaks of light.

Read on for more including diagrams and viewing tips.

Ken Scott captured these Perseid meteors last August over a 2 1/2 hour period at the D.H. Day Farm in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. He says that the barn is lit by rogue lightning and that this is a composite of many meteor images, where each photo is rotated around the north star so that the ‘point of origin’ of the shower can be seen better. He understands it visually but not scientifically – anyone have a simple explanation for him?

View his photo bigger, see more in his Skies Above slideshow, and view and purchase his work at kenscottphotography.com.