Great Lakes (and Lake St Clair) Morning

Great Lakes Morning by Emanuel Dragoi

Great Lakes Morning by Emanuel Dragoi

Depending on who you ask, there’s as few as four Great Lakes because Michigan & Huron are sort of the same lake, and as many as six if you include Lake St. Clair. Whatever the case, we’ll allow it for the purposes of this photo of the blue waters of St. Clair. Have a great weekend & see more in Emanuel’s Michigan gallery on Flickr!

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Gloom over West Grand Traverse Bay

gloom-over-grand-traverse-bay

Gloom over Grand Traverse Bay, photo by Amie Lucas

View Amie’s photo background bigilicious, see more in her Central Michigan slideshow, and be sure to follow Amie Lucas Photography on Facebook.

PS: You can get Amie’s 2017 Calendar on her website.

Dive in before Summer 2016 is over!!

Sunset Dive

Sunset Dive, photo by Niki Collis

Can you believe that Summer 2016 is almost over?? Here’s hoping you get a chance to enjoy the last, golden moments of summer this weekend!

View Niki’s photo from Crystal Lake taken Labor Day Weekend 2009 bigger, check out more of Niki’s awesome Summer photos, and view her work at nikicollisphotography.com.

Lynx rufus, Bobcat in Michigan

It’s feeling like Wild Kingdom week at Michigan in Pictures. An update on the eagle nest from yesterday is that one of the eggs is now an eaglet – click to view!!

Bobcat on the Dock

Close Encounter…, photo by Dale DeVries

Dale writes that this close encounter was…

Of the Kitty Cat kind! Around dusk last night I saw the flash from my trail cam go off, so I grabbed binoculars to see what was on the dock. It was so dark I really could not make out what was there, I assumed it to be a raccoon or two. I was quite surprised to see this beautiful Bobcat patrolling the water’s edge!

The UM Animal Diversity Web’s entry for Lynx rufus, the bobcat says (in part):

Bobcats can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, semi-deserts, mountains, and brushland. They sleep in hidden dens, often in hollow trees, thickets, or rocky crevices.

…Bobcat fur can be various shades of buff and brown, with dark brown or black stripes and spots on some parts of the body. The tip of the tail and the backs of the ears are black. They have short ear tufts, and ruffs of hair on the side of the head, giving the appearance of sideburns.

Like many felids, bobcats are solitary animals. The male and female interact almost exclusively during the mating season. These cats rarely vocalize, although they often yowl and hiss during the mating season. Bobcats are basically terrestrial and nocturnal, although they are good climbers and are often active at dusk as well as during the night.

Bobcats are strictly meat eaters. Stealthy hunters, they stalk their prey, then pounce and (if successful) kill with a bite to the vertebrae of the neck. They hunt rodents, rabbits, small ungulates, large ground birds, and sometimes reptiles. They occasionally eat small domesticated animals and poultry.

Bobcats live up to 12 years in the wild. In captivity, they may live up to 32 years.

Read on for more including photos and bobcat calls and in case you’re trying to figure out what you’re looking at, here’s page on distinguishing Michigan cougars & bobcats and another on the difference between bobcat & lynx (Lynx canadensis) that includes their distinct profiles.

View Dale’s photo background big and see more in his Fern Ridge Pictures slideshow.

More Michigan animals on Michigan in Pictures.

Sunrise Flight

Sunrise Flight

Sunrise Flight, photo by ptpomber

Safe & quick flights … and travels of any kind this weekend. Speaking of flight, if anyone can identify the bird from yesterday, that would be great!

View ptpomber’s photo bigger and see more from Mackinac Island including some very cool winter shots in his slideshow.

Old Dock

Old dock III (1 of 1)

Old dock III (1 of 1), photo by Todd Bielby

One day’s ruin is another day’s scenery…

View Todd’s photo background bigtacular and see more including a black & white view in his slideshowFYI, he shot this pic at Forrester Park, about 20 miles north of Port Huron.

Frequency

Frequency

Frequency, photo by Liz Glass

Liz says that these decaying pilings in Lake Charlevoix at Boyne City are the only remnants of the docks and roundhouse that stood at the waterfront during the town’s lumbering days. About this photo she writes:

Haven’t played with these guys in a while. This is the best time of year for them: we start having more colorful sunsets, and the ice that remains out on the lake helps keep the water still closer to shore. These pilings actually launched my ice fixation years ago when I noticed the elaborate frozen coats they grow in the winter. And then they became a year-round obsession themselves.

By the way, there’s no monkey-business here other than darkening the pilings a little to make them solid black. This is how it looked.

View her photo bigger and see more in her Pilings slideshow.

More from Liz on Michigan in Pictures.