Waterfall Wednesday: Schweitzer Falls

Schweitzer Falls by Michigan Nut Photography

Schweitzer Falls by Michigan Nut Photography

Every once in a while, I come across a Michigan waterfall I haven’t featured on Michigan in Pictures. Thankfully, GoWaterfalling always has me covered! Their entry for Schweitzer Falls says in part:

Schweitzer Falls is located a few miles south of Palmer Michigan. This is a very wild waterfall, despite being only a few hundred yards from the road. There is no established trail to the falls, and no signs of any human disturbance at falls. Despite that, reaching the waterfall is not particularly difficult.

Schweitzer Falls is a two tiered falls, dropping about 20′ feet in total. The second tier is higher and steeper than the first, and you can get nice and close to it. There was not simple and obvious way to get close to the upper tier. If you are willing to get your feet wet you could probably just wade through the pool at the base of the lower tier and climb the rock to see the upper one.

Head over to GoWaterfalling for directions & check out many more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures!

If you’re not following John at Michigan Nut on Facebook what are you even doing?? View & purchase his work at MichiganNutPhotography.com.

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Earl Young & the Mushroom Houses of Charlevoix

Mushroom House in Charlevoix Michigan by Lee Rentz

Mushroom House in Charlevoix, Michigan by Lee Rentz

Visit Charlevoix shares the story of self-taught builder Earl Young & his “mushroom houses” in Charlevoix:

Starting in 1919, and continuing into the seventies, Young fashioned over two dozen creations using indigenous materials.

Over the course of his fifty-year career, Young would build twenty-six residential houses and four commercial properties. His works are made mostly of stone, using limestone, fieldstone, and boulders that he found throughout Northern Michigan. Each of these houses is individually different and was designed to blend in with its surrounding landscape. Earl Young’s houses feature his signature designs, along with wide, wavy eaves, exposed rafter tails; cedar-shake roofs; and a horizontal emphasis in design. These buildings are creatively known as Gnome Homes, Mushroom Houses, or Hobbit Houses.

Many of the homes are accessible within a reasonable walking distance from downtown; more can be seen by car. Downtown, Stafford’s Weathervane Restaurant and Weathervane Terrace Inn & Suites on Pine River Lane, and the Lodge hotel on Michigan Avenue are also his creations.

Head over to Visit Charlevoix for a self-guided tour map!

See more from Lee on his Flickr & also at his photography blog!

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Fog Rainbows

Fog Rainbows by Noah Sorenson

Fog Rainbows by Noah Sorenson

Noah caught some awesome shots on a recent visit to the Keweenaw Peninsula. For sure follow him @noahsorensenphoto on Instagram!

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America’s First Urban Freeway: Detroit’s Davison Freeway

The Davison Urban Freeway by Wayne State University

The Davison Urban Freeway by Wayne State University

The Daily Detroit is one of my favorite Michigan podcasts, and their story on The Davison, America’s First Urban Freeway in Detroit is pretty cool: 

While freeways are pretty standard in American cities now, it wasn’t always that way. Instead of the ability to potentially go up to 70 miles an hour like on today’s highways, motorists had to use regular city streets to cross town. That was especially the case for motorists who wanted to cross Highland Park and enter Detroit.

Everyone piled onto Davison Avenue, the only large street that ran through Highland Park and connected to Detroit running roughly east to west. The avenue and freeway was named after an English immigrant from the 1840s that settled in the area, Jared Davison (it was then Hamtramck Township). His farm was approximately between Woodward and Oakland avenues along the south side of the street.

It wasn’t uncommon for drivers to spend 15 minutes sitting in traffic to reach Detroit. By 1940, thanks to Detroit’s growth and the growth of auto factories, Davison Avenue was approaching gridlock during rush hour by 1940.

…By November 1942, the five and a half mile long Davison Freeway was finished. It opened without a dedication ceremony, probably due to the desperate need the defense plants had for a functioning freeway. Despite its lack of dedication, the freeway became the first one of its kind – an urban freeway meant to connect one part of a metro area with another with as little interruption as possible.

…Ironically, the invention from Highland Park eventually played a key role in emptying the city out. In 1992, Chrysler moved their headquarters down the road – off of I-75 with a special off-ramp built for the development – to Auburn Hills, to follow the trend of suburban sprawl that the American highway system helped enable.

Read more at the Daily Detroit!

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The Last Thing You’ll Ever See

The Last Thing You'll Ever See by William Dolak

The Last Thing You’ll Ever See by William Dolak

Bill shared this photo from the West Lake Nature Preserve in Portage in our Michigan in Pictures group on Facebook & writes:

If you were a fly or a mosquito, this grotesque monster might be your conveyance to the afterlife. Michigan has several native carnivorous plants growing in bogs throughout the state; this one is the pitcher plant. It entices its prey by collecting rainwater; when the insect climbs in for a drink it is trapped by barbs and drowned in the pool. The plant then absorbs the nutrients from the decaying bodies…most gruesome, indeed.

You can check out some more pics from West Lake preserve by Bill including these shots of a Pink Lady Slipper on Facebook.  Read more about the pitcher plant (with another pic from Bill) on Michigan in Pictures!

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Petite Pointe Au Sable Lighthouse

Little Sable Lighthouse 4 by kmoyerus

Little Sable Lighthouse 4 by kmoyerus

Visit Ludington explains that Little Sable Point Lighthouse was originally named Petite Pointe Au Sable:

Located in the Silver Lake State Park at the Silver Lake Sand Dunes, the Little Sable Point Lighthouse is a 107′ brick structure, constructed in 1874. This lighthouse is one of the tallest in the state of Michigan at over 100 feet and 130 steps to climb the tower. About 30 miles north, you can visit the other “Point” along Lake Michigan which is home to the Big Sable Point Lighthouse located within the Ludington State Park.

…it cost $35,000 to build and contained 3 rooms. The rare third order Fresnel lens emitted a constant white light, and flashed a brighter light at set intervals, visible 19 miles into Lake Michigan.

The early 1900s saw some changes to the lighthouse. In 1900 the tower was painted white, and an access road and storage building were added in 1902. The name was changed in 1910 to Little Sable Point Lighthouse, meaning “little point of sand,” representing its location which juts into Lake Michigan. In 1977, the tower paint was removed and the original brick exposed.

Over the years, the lighthouse has had 15 keepers; and for one month, a woman took over when the original keeper took a temporary leave. The Sable Point Lighthouse Keepers Association took over the maintenance of the lighthouse in 2005, and it is open to the public from late May to late September.

The Light probably looked much the same in the 1870s as it did when kmoyerus took the photo in early May. See more in their Oceana County gallery on Flickr.

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Happy (belated) World Turtle Day!

Map Turtle by David Marvin

Map Turtle by David Marvin

World Turtle Day (May 23rd) is an annual day of recognition that was started in 2000 by American Tortoise Rescue to raise awareness about turtles & help preserve endangered turtles worldwide. Although it was yesterday, I can’t let it pass without comment & really hope you take the time to Know Your Michigan Turtles. We have TEN native species in Michigan, including the common map turtle

David took this photo back in 2014 and you can see more from him in his Lansing gallery on Flickr.

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Stormin’ Norman

Stormin Normin by Jim Datema

Stormin Normin by Jim Datema

Cool shot of a tribal fishing boat in Leland harbor. See more on Jim’s Flickr!

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The Beacon

The Beacon by James Woolcock

The Beacon by James Woolcock

James caught an awesome sunset at the Eagle Harbor Lighthouse on the Keweenaw Peninsula. Head over to his Flickr for more!

You can read about Eagle Harbor Lighthouse & see another angle on Michigan in Pictures.

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It’s Asparagus Season in Michigan!

Purple Curl by Mark Smith

Purple Curl by Mark Smith

The Michigan Asparagus Advisory Board says that:

The countdown to the kickoff of the 2021 Michigan asparagus season is officially over, as the seasonal favorite will be making its way to retailers across the nation. As a result of unexpected cooler temperatures at the traditional start of the season, the Michigan Asparagus Advisory Board (MAAB) has announced that the production area of West-central Michigan began harvesting and packing this week.

“Because asparagus depends on weather, it does tend to be somewhat unpredictable,” explained Jamie Clover Adams, Executive Director of the MAAB. “But as all our Michigan asparagus fans out there will tell you, it is a veggie that is well-worth the wait.”

Mother Nature imposed her own plans for the “normal” Mother’s Day season, with near or below freezing night temperatures delaying the start of the harvest for about a week.

Fresh Michigan asparagus is definitely something I stop for at roadside stands. You can get some great asparagus recipes from the MAAB including the clubhouse leader for my dinner tonight, an Asparagus Bacon & Cheese Tart – YUM!!

Mark took this photo a few years ago & you can see more in his Garden gallery on Flickr.

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