Reflections on Fall Color

Reflected colors by Ann Fisher

Reflected colors by Ann Fisher

“How beautifully leaves grow old. How full of light and color are their last days.”
– John Burroughs

Ann took this photo back in October of 2015 on the Dead River, just west of Marquette in the Upper Peninsula. See more in her 2015 U.P. Gallery.

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Seney Reflections

Reflections by Ayman Haykal

Reflections by Ayman Haykal

The Seney National Wildlife Refuge:

…was established in 1935 as a refuge and breeding ground for migratory birds and other wildlife. The wild land that today is the refuge has not always appeared so wild. This is a land that was once heavily logged, burned, ditched, drained and cultivated. Despite repeated attempts, the soils and harsh conditions of this country would not provide a hospitable environment for sustained settlement and agriculture. So, nature claimed it once again. What was viewed as a loss by early 20th century entrepreneurs became a huge gain for the wildlife, natural resources and the people of Michigan’s eastern Upper Peninsula.

Seney National Wildlife Refuge is located in the east-central portion of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, halfway between Lake Superior and Lake Michigan. The 95,238 acre refuge encompasses the 25,150 acre Seney Wilderness Area, which contains the Strangmoor Bog National Natural Landmark.

Lots more information at the Seney Refuge website. Ayman took this back in early August. See more on his Flickr!

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Trees, Reflected

Trees Reflected by Joel Dinda

Trees Reflected by Joel Dinda

Here’s a lovely shot from the Maple River State Game Area which:

…is mid-Michigan’s largest contiguous wetland complex, an extensive area of floodplains, lowlands, and marshes along the Maple River that begins in Gratiot County and spills into Clinton County … Hiking opportunities are available in the East Unit, however. Straddling US-27, the East Unit features pools and diked-in ponds that serve as the water basin for the Maple River and attract migrating birds. Hiking along dikes is easy and the spectacular congregations of birds among the cattails in the warm glows of a late afternoon sun makes this trail system scenic and interesting for families and anybody who enjoys birding.

…Wildlife can be viewed practically year-round in the game area. Spring viewing from March through May is excellent as thousands of ducks, geese, and swans use the wetlands as a stopover on their migration to northern breeding grounds. Throughout the summer herons are a common sight in the area while the observant or those who pack along binoculars might spot bald eagles or ospreys perched on dead snags.

See more in Joel’s massive Trees photo album on Flickr & have a great week!

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Loooking at yourself in the mirror: Portage Lake Lift Bridge edition

Reflections by Eric Hackney Photography

Here’s a #TBT (Throwback Thursday) pic from 3 years ago of the Portage Lake Lift Bridge between Houghton & Hancock on Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula. Wikipedia’s Portage Lake Lift Bridge entry says:

The Portage Lake Lift Bridge connects the cities of Hancock and Houghton, Michigan, USA, across Portage Lake, a portion of the waterway which cuts across the Keweenaw Peninsula with a canal linking the final several miles to Lake Superior to the northwest. US 41 and M-26 are both routed across the bridge.

The original bridge on this site was a wooden swing-bridge built in 1875. This was replaced by a steel swing-bridge built by the King Bridge Company in 1901. This bridge was damaged when a ship collided with it in 1905. The center swinging section of the bridge was replaced and a similar incident almost occurred again in 1920, but the ship was able to stop by dropping its anchor, which snagged on the bottom of the lake. In 1959, this bridge was replaced, at a cost of about 11-13 million US dollars (sources vary), by the current bridge which was built by the American Bridge Company.

As its name states, the bridge is a lift bridge with the middle section capable of being lifted from its low point of four feet clearance over the water to a clearance of 100 feet (30 m) to allow boats to pass underneath. The Bridge is the world’s heaviest and widest double-decked vertical lift bridge.Its center span “lifts” to provide 100 feet (30 m) of clearance for ships. The bridge is a crucial lifeline, since it is the only land based link between the north (so-called Copper Island) and south sections of the Keweenaw peninsula.

You can view the photo & more on Eric’s Facebook page and see a stunning shot of a rainbow over the bridge & more from Eric on Michigan in Pictures.

More bridges on Michigan in Pictures.

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Stillwater

Stillwater, photo by Jamey Robertson

One of the things I love about spring in Michigan – even in a very windy spring like 2017 – are those days when the water is smooth as glass.

View the photo of the soon to be filled Northport Marina bigger and follow Jamey on Instagram for more.

May Day Mirror

Reflections, photo by cncphotos

Here’s a sweet shot from May 1st last year of a Great Blue Heron patiently fishing.

View the photo background bigtacular and see more in cncphotos’ Birds slideshow.

More spring wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

Political Reflections

upside-down-capitol-building

Political Reflections, photo by Matt Kazmierski

Whatever we feel about the outcome of this election, I think we can all agree that it’s nice to not have politics in our face for a few minutes.

View Matt’s photo bigger and see more in his slideshow.

Imported from Detroit … and from old media

Imported from Detroit by NightFox Photography

Imported from Detroit, photo by Cory Smith/NightFox Photography

I flagged today’s photo a while back as one to feature on Michigan in Pictures. Cory shared it in 2010 with the tagline of the very successful Chrysler ad “Imported from Detroit”. You may remember that ad featured Detroit’s own Eminem along with scenes of the city at work. This morning I shared “Anthem of Us” directed by Stephen McGee. It’s a powerful short film about Detroit featuring hip hop artist Big Sean talking about his city along with beautiful footage of the Motor City at work.

The film is presented by Bedrock, a commercial real estate company focusing on the Midwest’s urban cores, and we will likely see more and more features like this as brands forsake traditional and increasingly ineffective media channels for direct, social media connection with their audiences. I want to stress that it doesn’t seem at all like a re-hash or rip-off of the Chrysler ad, and in my opinion it does a better job of capturing the city as it goes about its business.

View Cory’s photo bigger, see more in his HDR Photography slideshow, and also check out his work at nightfoxphoto.com.

…and here’s that Imported from Detroit commercial just in case you were wanting it.

Healy Lake Reflections

Healy Lake Fall Color

Healy Lake Reflections, photo by Dorn Gallatin

Hope everyone has a great weekend and gets out there to take a big bite out of autumn before winter eats it all!

Here’s a map to Healy Lake, located not far from Onekama. Lake Link’s entry for Healy Lake says:

Healy Lake is located in Manistee County, Michigan. This lake is 39 acres in size. It is 50.00 feet deep at its deepest point. Anglers can expect to catch a variety of fish including Bluegill, Largemouth Bass, Northern Pike, Sunfish and Yellow Perch.

Click to view it bigger and see more in Dorn’s Fall slideshow.

More Michigan lakes on Michigan in Pictures.

Torch Lake Afterglow

Torch Lake Afterglow

Torch Lake Afterglow, photo by Heather Higham

Wikipedia shares that at 19 miles long, Torch Lake is Michigan’s longest inland lake, and our second largest inland lake*.

The name of the lake is not due to its shape, rather, is derived from translation from the Ojibwa name Was-wa-gon-ong meaning “Place of the Torches”, referring to the practice of the local native American population who once used torches at night to attract fish for harvesting with spears and nets. For a time it was referred to by local European settlers as “Torch Light Lake”, which eventually was shortened to its current name.

View Heather’s photo bigger and see more Torch Lake goodness (including some nothern lights) in her slideshow.

* If you’re curious to see the lineup, Houghton is biggest and the rest are right here.