Say you will

Say you will, photo by Brian Wolfe

Brian took this back in April of 2009 and shared some thoughts that I think all photographers (and people) would do well to consider:

This weekend I resolved to wake up for the dawn. With the days growing longer and the sun rising earlier, it will only get more difficult the longer I put it off. I was hoping for some brilliant cloud pattern to reflect amazing colors but like what happens so often, it was just (what I like to call) bland. This kind of killed my energy and I felt like I would rather have slept-in. Instead of turning for home, I expanded my perception of my surroundings, opened my eyes, and came up with some great stuff (I think so anyway).

View the photo background bigilicious, see more in Brian’s The Top Thirty slideshow, and definitely follow Brian on Instagram!

More Spring Wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

Wyandotte Waterfront Nuclear Sunrise

wyandotte-waterfront-nuclear-sunrise

Wyandotte Waterfront Nuclear Sunrise, photo by 1adamtwelve

“….when the sun comes up, I couldn’t tell where heaven stopped and the earth began. It’s so beautiful.”
-Forrest Gump

Adam shares that this photo was captured at sunrise along Wyandotte’s waterfront while he was flirting with Mother Nature, something I think we could probably all use more of.

You can view this bigger and see more in Adam’s slideshow. One note – there are  few tasteful boudoir shots in there, so if that’s something you’d rather not see, don’t click the link!

Frozen Map of Dawn

frozen-map-of-dawn

Frozen Map of Dawn, photo by Heather Higham

Heather writes: Ice formations trace a map in an inland lake’s surface as a mountain of pink clouds engulfs the sky.

View her photo bigger, see more in her slideshow, and view & purchase photos at Snap Happy Gal Photography.

Headed into Lake Charlevoix

foggy-harbor

Foggy Harbor, photo by Julie

Julie says that yesterday they had thick fog in Charlevoix and she spotted this boat heading out into Lake Charlevoix.

View her photo bigger and see more in Julie’s massive Charlevoix slideshow.

Dawn Patrol

dawn-patrol-by-soaring-pigeon

Dawn Patrol, photo by Soaring Pigeon

Soaring Pigeon caught this coyote stalking at sunrise.

View the photo bigger and see more in his slideshow.

Michigan’s Second Oldest City: Looking back on St. Ignace

st-ignace-lighthouse-explore-july-20-2012

St Ignace Lighthouse, photo by Sheldon Spurrell

You may know that Père Jacques Marquette founded Michigan’s oldest city Sault Sainte-Marie in 1668, but do you know Michigan’s second old city? If you can read titles, you know that’s St. Ignace, founded in 1671 and named in honor of Saint Ignatius of Loyola. Here’s some of the history of St. Ignace from the St. Ignace Visitor’s Bureau:

The natives of the St. Ignace region were migratory. In the spring, the Anishinabeg gathered maple sugar and fished sturgeon and smelt. Summer found them in settlements surrounded by crops of corn, potatoes and squash, and near the abundant supplies of wildlife, fish and berries. They developed efficient housing, watercraft, hunting and farming tools.

The heritage of the Straits evolved and changed over the centuries beginning with the arrival of Roman Catholic missionaries and then French and British explorers and fur traders … The natural waterway joining Lakes Michigan and Huron at the Straits of Mackinac generated extensive water traffic, and prompted the establishment of an outpost during the period of French occupation. The outpost – Fort de Buade – became the seat of King Louis XIV’s authority in the interior of North America. French notables including Rene-Robert Cavalier, Sieur de La Salle and Antoine Lamothe Cadillac spent time at the post. St. Ignace was among the largest settlements in New France from the last decade of the 15th century until the establishment of Detroit in 1701. The British arrived in the St. Ignace region with the defeat of the French during Seven Years War.

St. Ignace played a pivotal role in the fur trade until this industry began to wane. By the mid-1800’s the financial importance of commercial fishing to the economic well-being of the area eclipsed that of the fur trade. Ancillary industries including curing, packing and shipping augmented the fishery. It was during this period that the Mackinaw Boat became a familiar sight on the waters in and around the Straits. As the lumber industry in Michigan evolved, St. Ignace became a center for mill yards and its proximity to the shipping lanes added to its importance as a commercial hub in the northern Great Lakes area.

Read on for more including travel information.

Sheldon took this photo back in July of 2012 at sunrise. View it bigger and see more in his Michigan slideshow.

More from St. Ignace on Michigan in Pictures.

Last Dawn of Summer

last-dawn-of-the-summer

Last Dawn of Summer, photo by John Robert Williams Photography

Since I shared something from the first day of fall, it seems only fitting that I share something from the last day of summer! Here’s a stunning sunrise over West Grand Traverse Bay in Traverse City by my friend John!

Click the pic to view it background bigilicious and get more from John, including professional portraits at jrwpix.com!

More Traverse City and more summer wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures!