Autumn Pasture

Autumn Pasture by paulh192

Autumn Pasture by paulh192

Paul captured a gorgeous fall scene last week. See what he’s found lately on his Flickr!

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Sunflower Sunset

Sunflowers at Liefde Farm

Sunflowers at Liefde Farm

I guess it’s Sunflower Season on Michigan in Pictures! Rapid Growth Media shared the story of of the sunflowers that are drawing folks to Liefde Farm in West Michigan:

Tucked away on a quiet stretch of country road in Olive Township, amid barns and lush green crops flourishing in the midsummer heat, is a field of golden yellow that pops in the evening sun.

Lindsey Dykstra, owner of Liefde Farm, has planted hundreds of sunflowers on a stretch of land behind her home. It’s easy to miss this sight while traveling along 104th Avenue, just south of Fillmore Street, as the flowers are hidden behind her barn.

But word has spread, and Dykstra’s quiet property, at 9400 104th Ave., is alive with a steady stream of visitors these days. She, her husband, Kevin, and her two children enjoy sitting outside and watching the photographers and happy families gathering for pictures.

“It’s nice to see people enjoy it,” Dykstra says with a smile, noting the many places that are closed due to public health concerns. “This is kind of a safer option because you can be outside.”

You can read on for more & definitely head over to the Farm’s Facebook page for more pics & information on visiting.

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Sunday Night on Lavender Hill

Sunday Night on Lavender Hill by Gary Ennis Photography

Gary says that the bees were busy at Lavender Hill Farm near Boyne City the other night. See it bigger on Facebook!

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Interference

Interference by Bill Dolak

Bill captured this interesting abstract of the lines made by two center-pivot irrigators in a soybean field near Vicksburg. See more in his massive Michigan: Kalamazoo County album & a lot more of his photography in our Michigan in Pictures group on Facebook!

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Four Horsepower Plow

amish-farmer-plowing-james-korringa

Amish Farmer Plowing, photo by James Korringa

James took this photo of an Amish farmer plowing his field early Friday morning near Stanton. View it bigger and be sure to check out his Amish Barn Raising slideshow!

Today’s the Day for the Michigan Apple Crunch!

grand-traverse-bay-apples

apples, photo by Diane Greene Lent

A Healthier Michigan is a pretty cool blog with some state-specific tips for better health. Their post on the annual  Michigan’s Apple Crunch Day (Thursday, October 13)  says that every October, schools, organizations, and businesses bite into Michigan apples on the same day, setting records for apples eaten.

It’s a partnership between the Michigan Department of Education, Michigan Farm to School, Cherry Capital Foods and Cultivate Michigan as a reminder of the importance of agriculture and knowing where your food comes from. Last year 400,000 people in Michigan ate a Michigan-grown apple on Apple Crunch Day!

The Michigan Apple Committee notes that with 11.3 million apple trees covering 35,500 acres on 825 family-run farms, Michigan is the nation’s third largest producer of apples!

View Diane’s photo of apples overlooking Grand Traverse Bay background big and see more in her Best 2012 slideshow.

Here’s a video with photos from last year’s Apple Crunch by Cherry Capital Foods!

Haying It

Haying It

Haying It, photo by John Wright

View John’s photo of a hay field near Standwood background bigtacular and see more in his slideshow.

More summer wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

Horn Road Orchard

Horn Road Orchard

Horn Road Orchard, photo by Mark Smith

Up here in the Traverse City area we don’t have cherry blossoms yet, but I’ve been seeing reports that cherries and other fruit crops are in bloom in southwest Michigan. Expect the TC area to bloom in a week or two and please share what you’re seeing in the comments!

View Mark’s photo background bigilicious and see more in his East of Leland slideshow.

More spring wallpaper and more orchards on Michigan in Pictures.

Double Rainbow

Double Rainbow

Double Rainbow, photo by Your Hometown Photography 

I simply love Atmospheric Optics for nearly everything about lights in the sky. Regarding secondary rainbows or “double rainbows” they say that the secondary is nearly always fainter than the primary, with colors reversed and more widely separated:

Light can be reflected more than once inside a raindrop. Rays escaping after two reflections make a secondary bow.

The secondary has a radius of 51º and lies some 9º outside the primary bow. It is broader, 1.8X the width of the primary, and its colours are reversed so that the reds of the two bows always face one another. The secondary has 43% of the total brightness of the primary but its surface brightness is lower than that because its light is spread over its greater angular extent. The primary and secondary are are concentric, sharing the antisolar point for a center.

About this particular rainbow from April 2, 2016, Gerry writes: “Double rainbow from the other night after the storms. The weather in Michigan can change quickly, from rainbows to snow. Yep, that’s Michigan.” 

Indeed. View her photo bigger and follow Your Hometown Photography on Facebook for more.

More rainbows on Michigan in Pictures.

Farm Market Friday: Red Haven Peaches

Red Haven Peaches

Peaches, photo by alyssa g

I’ve shared the story of the Redhaven peach before on Michigan in Pictures. Strangely enough, it featured a photo by a photographer named Alissa!

Peaches are rolling in at farm markets all across Michigan.  A favorite article that Michigan History Magazine shared on Absolute Michigan tells the story of A Peach of a Man:

Many people have contributed to Michigan’s fruit industry, but Stanley Johnston stands above the rest. Johnston not only developed a new peach that is the most widely grown peach in the world today. He also made Michigan the nation’s leading producer of blueberries.

Johnston was the superintendent of Michigan State University’s (MSU) experiment station in South Haven from 1920 to 1969. There, he developed a better peach. Johnston took peaches that had good features, like ones that ripened at different times or did not turn brown when canned or frozen. He took pollen from the male plant and joined it to the flower of the female plant. When the fruit grew, he collected seeds and started a new tree. When the tree produced fruit five years later, he could see if he made a better peach.

During his career, Johnston grew and studied more than 20,000 peach trees. Eight different types, called “havens” (for South Haven), were planted by farmers. Havens ripened earlier, so the peach-growing season was longer, which meant more peaches could be grown and sold. One of these peaches, named Redhaven for its nice red color, is the most popular peach in the world today.

Read on at Absolute Michigan and definitely get down to your local farmer’s market for some peachy goodness!

View Alyssa’s photo background bigalicious and see more in her Blake Farms slideshow.