Softening a Heart of Stone

There’s a first time for everything – apologies to Aaron Springer for partially incorrectly attributing today’s photo!!

heart-of-stone

Heart of Stone, photo by Aaron Springer

“Light softens even the hardest of hearts.”
~Aaron Springer

A nice sentiment for Valentine’s Day, and I hope you get a chance to spend some time this week enjoying the beautiful light of Michigan.

View Aaron’s photo biggerand see more awesome shots from the Old Mission Peninsula and elsewhere in his slideshow.

There’s 10+ years of Valentine’s Day photos on Michigan in Pictures.

February Ice … and 10,000 Leelanau Photos

february-ice

Lake Michigan … February ice, photo by Ken Scott Photography

Some followers of Michigan in Pictures may know that I live in Leelanau County, the village of Leland to be precise. The first website I ever built was Leelanau.com, and as with Michigan in Pictures, I have a photo group on Flickr. One of my favorite pursuits is hiking the shoreline, and when I returned from a hike yesterday, I noticed that the Leelanau.com Group had 9,999 photos. The 9999th is the one above from a year ago, fittingly by top contributor, professional photographer, and dedicated Leelanau-booster Ken Scott.  I realized that I had a pic from almost exactly the same spot!

View Ken’s photo on Flickr, see more in his Lake Michigan Ice & Caves slideshow, and follow Ken Scott Photography on Facebook!

wavy-day-in-leland

You can see mine and more photos & videos from the day in my Wavy Day in Leland slideshow.

PS: The Absolute Michigan pool is the one I use for Michigan in Pictures, and it has well over 200,000 photos!

Turtle Club

turtle-club

Turtle Club, photo by Andrew McFarlane

“Am I not turtley enough for the turtle club?”
-Dana Carvey, Master of Disguise

Pretty sure it’s just sleeping.

I took this photo last weekend on a walk along Lake Michigan in the Leelanau Conservancy’s Whaleback Natural Area just south of Leland.

View it background big and see more in my Lake Michigan, Pearl of America slideshow.

More winter wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

Sunset on Michigan’s “November Summer”

port-austin-sunset

Port Austin Sunset, photo by Sarang Patki

While the implications of it are not good for the long term, there’s no denying that we’ve had a truly incredible run of warmth this November. The Detroit News reports that a new November 18th record high of 71 degrees was recorded yesterday at Detroit Metro Airport. Today however, temps there are barely expected to get above 40 with strong wind and rain. Elsewhere in Michigan:

Waves in the Lake Superior are forecast to reach 22 to 33 feet in Lake Superior between 1 a.m. and 4 a.m. Saturday.

Northern Michigan is set to receive strong winds and snowfall in places such as Gaylord could accumulate, according to NWS. “The combination of gusty winds and snow will create near white-out conditions at times Saturday afternoon and evening, especially in lake-effect areas off Lake Michigan and Lake Superior,” the NWS says in a statement on its website.

The Thumb area of Michigan is also in for severe weather. Port Hope, off the coast of Lake Huron, will see ongoing rain and snowfall. Waves will be up to 12 feet on Saturday night and could possibly hit 16 feet on Sunday. A gale warning is in effect from 1 a.m. Saturday to 4 a.m. Monday.

It was fun while it lasted I guess and I hope you stored up plenty of Vitamin D and sunny feelings!

Sarang says that it was totally worth stopping at this roadside park near Port Austin for a sunset pic over Lake Huron – I quite agree! View the photo bigger and catch another shot from this beach and more in their slideshow.

More beaches and more Lake Huron on Michigan in Pictures.

God Rays on Saginaw Bay

god-rays-over-saginaw-bay-by-tom-clark

God’s Rays over Saginaw Bay, photo by Tom Clark

Awesome shot from one month ago on Saginaw Bay! View Tom’s photo bigger and see more in his Skyscapes slideshow.

More from Saginaw on Michigan in Pictures.

Sunrise on McCarty’s Cove & Marquette Harbor Lighthouse

%22mccartys-cove%22-marquette-harbor-lighthouse-marquette-michigan

“McCarty’s Cove” Marquette Harbor Lighthouse, photo by John McCormick

Just got back from Marquette, and I have to say, this is one cool city!!

John took this photo back in August of 2011 at sunrise at McCarty’s Cove, one of Marquette’s best beaches according to Travel Marquette. I really had to dig (seriously, a Mining Journal history quiz was all I had to go on) to learn that McCarty’s Cove is named after Mike McCarty whose business, Lake Superior Ice, operated at that location. I’m not sure how long, but in 1919 they took over the Marquette Ice Company. Know more? Post it in the comments!

UPDATE:  Ann Fisher (who is a contributing photographer to Michigan in Pictures) shares:

“McCarty’s ice business lasted at least into my childhood (late 50’s, early 60’s). I remember going there to buy ice when we were making homemade ice cream in our hand-cranked ice cream maker.”

The Marquette Harbor Lighthouse is now a museum – click for more.

View John’s photo bigger, see more in his Sunsets/Sunrises slideshow, and view and purchase his work at michigannutphotography.com (FYI you can buy this photo right here).

What’s in a name: Petoskey Stone Edition

petoskey-stone-on-the-lake-michigan-waterline

Waterline, photo by Andrew McFarlane

This is one of my photos that I dug up for another project that I wanted to share. Apparently this was taken during in my “tilty” phase. ;)

Here’s something beautiful that a young woman I know named Rose Petoskey wrote about Petoskey stones several years ago.

My name is Noozeen (Rose) Nimkiins (Little Thunder) Petoskey (Rising Sun) and I am Anishinaabek.

Many people would associate the word Petoskey with the souvenir stone found on the northern Lake Michigan shorelines. However, to my family, the word Petoskey represents much more than a souvenir.

In the Odawa language, the word Petoskey (Bii-daa-si-ga) means the rising sun, the day’s first light, or the sun’s first rays moving across the water. The Petoskey stone is a fossilized coral created by impressions made in limestone during the last Michigan ice age. These stones were named “Petoskey” because the impressions resembled the rising sun coming up over the water. Just as the image of the rising sun is implanted within the Petoskey stone, the archaeology of a person’s names is implanted within. All names within our Anishinaabek culture reflect an individual’s personal history. Rocks go deep, but names go much deeper to reveal the stories of the past.

Read on for more of Rose’s thoughts the power and beauty of the Odawa language!

View my photo from 9 years ago background bigilicious and see more in my Leland, Michigan slideshow.

More summer wallpaper and more from the beach on Michigan in Pictures

PS: The other project was for a stone path that a friend is building this year at the Earthwork Harvest Gathering held next weekend near Lake City (September 16-18). It’s a wonderful festival packed with Michigan musicians!