Thoughts on beating Ohio…

View from the Top of the Mackinac Bridge by Ken Scott Photography.jpg

View from the Top … of the Mackinac Bridge by Ken Scott Photography

On Saturday, the Michigan Wolverines defied recent history and absolutely thrashed the Ohio State Buckeyes 42-27 in the Big House. While this is certainly a huge victory by Michigan over Ohio, it pales in comparison to one the greatest fleecings in history, the trade of the 468 square mile Toledo Strip for the entire Upper Peninsula. Not bad eh? Read all about it in Michigan, Ohio & the Best Worst Deal Ever on Michigan in Pictures.

Ken took this photo looking north at a portion of Michigan’s haul from one of the towers on the Mighty Mac with St. Ignace, Mackinac Island and Round Island on the horizon. See more in his Mackinac Stuff gallery on Flickr & for sure view and purchase his work at kenscottphotography.com

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Waterfall Wednesday: Reany Creek Falls

Reany Creek Falls by Aaron Strouse

Reany Creek Falls by Aaron Strouse

Waterfalls of the Keweenaw entry for Reany Falls says in part:

With a location close to a well-known Marquette destination (Dead River Falls) Reany Falls is a surprisingly photographed and popular waterfall. Composed a few small drops along a narrow creek, the main focus is a three-way split plunge nestled in the bedrock that is viewable from the road’s bridge above. Smaller drops are located above these falls, although the narrow little canyon makes viewing them difficult.

Aaron took this photo back in August of 2017. See more in his massive Michigan waterfalls gallery on Flickr.

More Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures!

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Waterfall Wednesday: Kakabika Falls

Kakabika Falls by Neil Weaver

Kakabika Falls by Neil Weaver

Travel the Mitten has a great entry on Kakabika Falls that says (in part):

The Ottawa National Forest covers more than 990,000 acres of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and is a popular spot for outdoor recreation, camping, and wildlife viewing. The forest is also home to many waterfalls including Kakabika Falls, a set of cascades on the Cisco Branch of the Ontonagon River. These falls can be reached by a short drive north of the Watersmeet/Marenisco area, and a short, easy hike into the woods. The setting here is peaceful and there is a good chance you won’t encounter other travelers when you visit.

The tallest drop of Kakabika Falls is maybe 8 to 10 feet (most of the drops range from 1 to 5 feet), but this waterfall is more about the sum of its multiple drops than one large drop. The river makes a series of S turns here, and the trail closely parallels the river providing many great vantage points of each drop. As is the case with most waterfalls of this size, it is always best to visit in the spring or after decent rainfall. In dry summer months, we have found that there was barely any water flow here.

Click through for more including photos, map & directions from a really excellent website for Michigan travel ideas!

Neil shared that this is one of the many magical places in the Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, something that one look at his Instagram is all you need to see the truth in that! You can also follow Neil Weaver Photography on Facebook and view & purchase prints (including this one) on his website.

Many (many) more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures!

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Fall colors on the Peshekee River

Fall colors on the Peshekee River by Michigan Sea Grant

Fall colors on the Peshekee River by Michigan Sea Grant

Michigan Sea Grant is a cooperative program of the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. I’m a huge fan of this program that funds research, education, and outreach projects designed to foster science-based decisions about the use and conservation of Great Lakes resources.

Todd recently took this photo of Highway 41 as it crosses the Peshekee River in the Upper Peninsula. He shares “I remember heading out early to catch some good morning light, but it was foggy, which made for some nice photos, but my main reason was to get some fall color near water. I had to wait a bit before the fog lifted, and it was worth it!”

Follow Michigan Sea Grant on Instagram for more pics & for sure visit michiganseagrant.org for more about this vital organization!

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Thanks for the wilderness, Congressman Dale Kildee!

Sturgeon River Gorge I by David Mayer

Sturgeon River Gorge I by David Mayer

This week longtime Congressman Dale Kildee passed away. Kildee, uncle of current Flint Representative Dan Kildee, represented Flint for over 30 years earning the nickname “the Cal Ripken of Congress.” He was involved in many efforts including some vital early childhood bills and (of course) auto industry support, but one interesting thing that I learned from writer David Dempsey is that Dale was the sponsor of the 1987 Michigan Wilderness Act which created 10 State Wilderness Areas protecting nearly 100,000 acres of old growth forest, dunes, lakes, and rivers including Sturgeon River Gorge.

Thank you Dale for your work on the behalf of Michigan’s wild places! Click for a map of all 18 of Michigan’s Wilderness Areas.

David took this back in October of 2012 in the Sturgeon River Gorge Wilderness. See more in his Porcupine Mountains gallery on Flickr.

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Autumn’s Rainbow at Rainbow Falls

Rainbow Falls on the Black River by Michigan Nut Photography

Rainbow Falls on the Black River by Michigan Nut Photography

Rainbow Falls is the last of five waterfalls on the Black River in the Upper Peninsula. You can read all about Rainbow Falls & the Black River (and see another shot of these falls by John) on Michigan in Pictures.

As you can see, the Yoop is looking pretty beautiful right now!! See more on the Michigan Nut Facebook & view and purchase prints at Michigan Nut Photography!

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Waterfall Wednesday: Upper Hungarian Falls

Upper Hungarian Falls by Eric Hackney

Upper Hungarian Falls by Eric Hackney

It’s Wednesday again so let’s make friends with one of Michigan’s 200+ named waterfalls. GoWaterfalling’s page on Hungarian Falls says:

Dover Creek tumbles overs a series of falls on its way down to Torch Lake. Two of the falls are around 20 feet high, and the last is a 50 foot drop, which is spectacular when the water is flowing. Unfortunately these falls are often nearly dry in the summer.

There are three falls 15 feet or higher on a half mile stretch of Dover Creek, plus a couple of smaller drops. In the spring time, or after some good rains, these waterfalls are very impressive. Unfortunately the creek has a very small watershed, and the falls are often reduced to trickles.

The three main drops are usually referred to as the upper, middle and lower falls. The upper falls is around 20 feet high. The water spills over an irregularly shaped cliff into a small gorge.

Get directions & info about this Keweenaw series of waterfalls at GoWaterfalling.

See more in Eric’s Personal Favorites gallery on Flickr and for sure check out his website to view & buy his prints!

Lots more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

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Waterfall Wednesday: Schweitzer Falls

Schweitzer Falls by Michigan Nut Photography

Schweitzer Falls by Michigan Nut Photography

Every once in a while, I come across a Michigan waterfall I haven’t featured on Michigan in Pictures. Thankfully, GoWaterfalling always has me covered! Their entry for Schweitzer Falls says in part:

Schweitzer Falls is located a few miles south of Palmer Michigan. This is a very wild waterfall, despite being only a few hundred yards from the road. There is no established trail to the falls, and no signs of any human disturbance at falls. Despite that, reaching the waterfall is not particularly difficult.

Schweitzer Falls is a two tiered falls, dropping about 20′ feet in total. The second tier is higher and steeper than the first, and you can get nice and close to it. There was not simple and obvious way to get close to the upper tier. If you are willing to get your feet wet you could probably just wade through the pool at the base of the lower tier and climb the rock to see the upper one.

Head over to GoWaterfalling for directions & check out many more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures!

If you’re not following John at Michigan Nut on Facebook what are you even doing?? View & purchase his work at MichiganNutPhotography.com.

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Waterfall Wednesday: Slate River Falls

Slate River Falls Splendor by Eric Hackney

Slate River Falls Splendor by Eric Hackney

GoWaterfalling is the premier source for information about Michigan’s many waterfalls. Their Slate River Falls entry says:

Slate River Falls is, unsurprisingly, on the Slate River. This is the largest of many drops over a three mile stretch of the river. This is a wild waterfall, with no fences, and the only trail is one left behind by the curious feet of others.

The falls are located along Skanee Road between L’Anse and Skanee, about 10 miles east of L’Anse. There is a sign marking the Slate River, so the falls are easier to find than some. The bridge over the river is just past Arvon Road. A few hundred feet east of the bridge there is a two track that leads to a small turn around. A rough trail starts here that follows the east side of the creek.

…If you continue upstream past the falls a few hundred yards you can find two smaller falls, Slide Falls and Ecstasy Falls (so named by kayakers). About 3 miles upstream you can find Quartzite Falls, Black Slate Falls and more unnamed drops. These falls can be reached by car. From Skanee Road head south on Avron Road, which is just west of the Slate River, for about 3.3 miles. Take the road to the right, which will soon cross the Slate River. A well groomed trail will lead you downstream to Quartzite Falls. Black Slate Falls and other drops are upstream and you just have to make your way along the river.

Detailed directions & more at GoWaterfalling.

Eric took this photo last summer. You can see a lot more of his adventures in his Personal Favorites gallery on Flickr & view/purchase his work on his website

More Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures!

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Cedar(eflection)

Cedar by Thomas Michael

Cedar by Thomas Michael

Just love this photo from Thomas – see more in his April 21 gallery on Flickr!

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