Confluence of Montreal River and Lake Superior

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Confluence of Montreal River and Lake Superior, photo by Kirt E. Carter

Waterfalls of the Keweenaw has a nice feature on the Montreal River and Montreal Falls that says in part:

Located right at the mouth of the Montreal River as it tumbles into Lake Superior, Montreal Falls is a rugged, beautiful cascade over blocky volcanic rocks. The views over the lake are incredible: to the west you can see Bare Bluff and Mt Bohemia rising along the lake shore, to the southwest the distant side of Bete Gris Bay, and to the south (on a clear day) the Huron Mountains ripple up above the lake. The drop sits at the last easily accessible southern spot on the tip of the Keweenaw, with Fish Cove, Keystone Bay, and Keweenaw Point a tough drive/hike beyond.

Some flat ground for camping sits on the shore of the waterfall, complete with a few fire rings and a convenient beach for kayakers, and during summer weekends a few tents can be found near the falls. A narrow trail leads up along the river towards Upper Montreal Falls, more traveled by fishermen than anyone else, and an even fainter path can be found leading further east to Fish Cove.

Read on more maps & more!

View Kirt’s photo bigger, see more in his slideshow, and see more work on his website.

Saxon Falls on the Montreal River

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Saxon Falls on the Montreal River, photo by Marty Hogan

GoWaterfalling’s page on Saxon Falls says (in part):

Saxon Falls is located on the Montreal River just a few miles upstream of Superior Falls, about 10 miles west of Ironwood. The Montreal River forms part of the border between Michigan and Wisconsin so the falls is technically in both states. It can be visited from either side, but both require a bit of work.

Like Superior Falls there is a dam and power plant here and the water is diverted. Unlike Superior Falls there is no visitor friendly viewing area for the falls. The falls are large and complicated. I visited the Wisconsin side where trees obscure most views of the falls. There are more drops than the one pictured. This is the upper drop. The lower drop is best seen from the Michigan side.

Read on for visiting tips!

View Marty’s photo background bigilicious and see more in his 2016 October Photo Trip slideshow. Seriously, do it – some awesome photos there!

Good morning from Bond Falls

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Good morning from Bond Falls….Burrrrr, photo by Joe Garza

View Joe’s photo bigger and see more at JMG Photography on Facebook.

More Bond Falls on Michigan in Pictures.

Lower Silver Falls

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Lower Silver Falls, photo by Tom Mortenson

GoWaterfalling’s page on Lower Silver Falls says:

Lower Silver Falls is located in Michigan’s Baraga county on the Silver River. The Silver River has many drops, and they are lumped together into the Lower, Middle and Upper Falls. The Lower Falls are not particularly impressive but they are very easy to visit.

The falls consists of two chutes where the river is constricted to a narrow channel. The second is the larger of the two, and the river drops about 15 feet in a thirty foot stretch while taking a turn.

Head over to GoWaterfalling to read about their big brother upstream, the Upper Silver River Falls!

View Tom’s photo from early October background big and see more in his Upper Michigan slideshow.

The Road Goes On

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The Road Goes On, photo by Ann Fisher

Not. Giving. Up. On. Fall.

View Ann’s photo background big and see more in her 2016 U.P. slideshow.

Lots more fall wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

Manganese Falls on the Keweenaw Peninsula

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Manganese Falls, photo by John Gagnon

GoWaterfalling’s page for Manganese Falls says in part:

Manganese Falls is a steep cascade falling into a narrow gorge. The gorge is so narrow that it is actually hard to see the falls. There is a well marked overlook for the falls, but trees mostly obscure the falls. The overlook is perched on top of a sheer cliff, so do not even think about climbing over the fences for a better view.

It is easy to get to the top of the falls and you can look down the gorge. Even better views of parts of the falls can be had from the far side of the gorge. A large stretch of the main drop is visible. Getting a shot of the base of the falls would be very difficult. First there is a large pool at the base of the falls surrounded by steep walls, with apparently no dry places to stand. Second getting down there would be very difficult and dangerous.

Manganese Falls is located along Manganese Road just south of Copper Harbor. The road is paved, but steep in places. The falls are less than a mile from town.

Read on for more including some visiting tips and alternative viewing ideas.

View John’s photo background bigtacular and see more in his Rivers/streams slideshow.

More waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures

Northern Lights and a Proton Arc!

Milky Way, A Proton Arc, and the Northern Lights

The Milky Way, A Proton Arc, and the Northern Lights!, photo by Eric Hackney

Last night I got a couple of texts that the northern lights were out. By the time I got to the beach here in northern lower Michigan, they had died back to a soft arc on the horizon. Up on the Keweenaw however, they were pretty spectacular!

In addition to being spectacular, Eric’s photos introduced me to a new northern lights term, the mysterious proton arc or proton aurora. which NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day explains in this link filled post (picture is below):

What are auroras made out of? Triggered by solar activity, normal auroras are caused by collisions between fast-moving electrons and the oxygen and nitrogen in Earth’s upper atmosphere. The electrons come from the magnetosphere, the region of space controlled by Earth’s magnetic field. As the excited oxygen and nitrogen molecules return to their low energy state, they emit light, seen as the auroral glow.

Sometimes, however, auroras can be caused by collisions with heavier protons, causing a more energetic display with strong ultraviolet emission. In addition, protons can temporarily capture an electron and emit light for themselves. Such a proton aurora is seen above, recorded by the IMAGE satellite. A special feature is the bright spot near picture center, embedded in a ring of auroral emission around the north magnetic pole of planet Earth.

Most solar wind protons never reach the Earth to cause auroras because they are completely deflected away at a great distance by the Earth’s magnetic field. The bright spot in the auroral ring indicates a particularly deep crack in the Earth’s magnetic field where protons were able to flow along a temporarily connected region between the Sun and the Earth, relatively undeflected, until they impacted the Earth’s ionosphere.

Read on for lots more. The good news? It looks like the wide coronal hole that was responsible for last night’s aurora will continue to kick out the celestial jams for a couple of days, meaning this weekend offers a great chance to see the northern lights in Michigan!

View Eric’s photo bigger and see more in his 9-1-16: Northern Lights IX slideshow.

Much more about the northern lights / aurora borealis on Michigan in Pictures!

Photo courtesy NASA:

Proton Arc Nasa