1939 Detroit Memorial Day Parade

1939 Detroit Memorial Day Parade down Woodward

1939 Detroit Memorial Day Parade, photo by Buildings of Detroit

Buildings of Detroit shared this photo back in 2013 saying:

Tonight the Wayback Machine continues to show us views of Detroit’s Memorial Day Parade down Woodward, this time in 1939. Most of the structures remain as they were in the previous 1920 image (click to see it!). We can clearly see Kern’s and an expanded Hudson’s, as well as Eaton Tower, Bond Clothing, and the Majestic Building along with the Detroit Opera House, now transformed into Sam’s Cut Rate clothing store.

View the photo bigger and definitely follow Buildings of Detroit on Facebook for lots more about Detroit’s unique architectural heritage.

Lots more Detroit on Michigan in Pictures!

Flip out because Summer 2016 is here!!

Grand Haven Flip

Grand Haven MI, photo by Cyndie M

Summer 2016 is here, and as it’s the only Summer 2016 you’re ever gonna have – I recommend you get the most out of it!!

Cyndie took this last week at the sand dunes by Grand Haven. View it background bigtacular, see more in her slideshow, and check out more of her work on her website.

PS: More summer wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures!

Memorial Day in Michigan: 1907 Edition

via leelanau.com

Suttons Bay May 27th 1907

Scene in Suttons Bay, May 27th. 1907, photo courtesy Leelanau Historical Society

Here’s the scene 110 years ago on Memorial Day in the village of Suttons Bay. Yikes!!

Hoping you have a safe and fun holiday weekend with the absolute minimum of snow!!

View the photo bigger, follow the Leelanau Historical Society on Facebook for more great photos, and check out their online photo archive for fun stuff like this search of Suttons Bay.

World War II Training on Lake Michigan

Wingspan

Wingspan, photo by Phil Squattrito

in advance of Memorial Day, the New York Times reviewed Heroes on Deck: World War II on Lake Michigan (trailer below) that tells the tale of how dozens of wrecked planes came to be on the bottom of that body of water. They write:

The film, by John Davies, recounts the training of pilots in how to land on aircraft carriers. Two passenger liners were stripped down and fitted with long decks (though not as long as the decks on actual aircraft carriers) and floated on Lake Michigan, where the training could take place without the threat posed by enemy submarines. Landing a plane on a floating airstrip was easier for some young men than others.

…Vintage footage shows crash after crash, though only a few fatalities resulted, in part because preflight training included how to escape if your plane were to go into the drink.

The film, showing on many public television outlets (including NJTV on Saturday and WLIW World on Sunday; check local listings), does more than just revisit an interesting tidbit of military history. It also chronicles present-day efforts to raise some of the planes from the lake bottom and restore them for display in museums and airports.

View Phil’s photo of this World War II fighter plane from the 2009 Gratiot County Airport open house background big and see more in his Transportation slideshow.

Here’s the trailer…

Imported from Detroit … and from old media

Imported from Detroit by NightFox Photography

Imported from Detroit, photo by Cory Smith/NightFox Photography

I flagged today’s photo a while back as one to feature on Michigan in Pictures. Cory shared it in 2010 with the tagline of the very successful Chrysler ad “Imported from Detroit”. You may remember that ad featured Detroit’s own Eminem along with scenes of the city at work. This morning I shared “Anthem of Us” directed by Stephen McGee. It’s a powerful short film about Detroit featuring hip hop artist Big Sean talking about his city along with beautiful footage of the Motor City at work.

The film is presented by Bedrock, a commercial real estate company focusing on the Midwest’s urban cores, and we will likely see more and more features like this as brands forsake traditional and increasingly ineffective media channels for direct, social media connection with their audiences. I want to stress that it doesn’t seem at all like a re-hash or rip-off of the Chrysler ad, and in my opinion it does a better job of capturing the city as it goes about its business.

View Cory’s photo bigger, see more in his HDR Photography slideshow, and also check out his work at nightfoxphoto.com.

…and here’s that Imported from Detroit commercial just in case you were wanting it.

Dancing in the Air: Birding Trails & Bird Sanctuaries in Michigan

Egrets Dancing in the Air

Dancing in the Air, photo by Jiafan(John) Xu

I’m pretty sure that these are Great Egrets (Ardea alba) but would appreciate confirmation from any birders in the audience.

On the Pure Michigan blog, Mallory King of the Michigan Audubon Society writes that birding is currently the second fastest growing hobby in the United States after gardening with over 47 million people identifying as birdwatchers. She shares some great Michigan birding trails and sanctuaries to help you get going with birding:

The Superior Birding Trail: This trail covers 150 miles in the Upper Peninsula from the Seney National Wildlife Refuge to Whitefish Point; you can observe over 300 bird species here.

The Sleeping Bear Birding Trail: The SBBT West which the trial is commonly referred too, includes 123 miles from Manistee to Traverse City along the scenic M-22 highway and Lake Michigan shoreline; here over 250 bird species can be observed.

The Beaver Island Birding Trail: Located entirely on Lake Michigan’s largest island, encompasses over 100 miles of road and 12,000 acres of natural habitat; over 250 bird species can be spotted on this adventurous trail.

The Saginaw Bay Birding Trail: Also known as SBBT East, takes travelers 142 miles along the Lake Huron shoreline from Port Crescent State Park to Tawas Point State Park, the trail is home to over 200 bird species and an abundance of quaint Michigan towns.

Read on for a list of the sanctuaries and more at Pure Michigan.

John took this last month, presumably in the Keweenaw area. View his photo bigger and see more in his slideshow.

Lots more Michigan birds on Michigan in Pictures!

Happy World Turtle Day from the Red-eared slider

Trachemys scripta Red-eared Slider

Trachemys scripta (Red-eared Slider), photo by Nick Scobel

One of the most popular posts on Michigan in Pictures is Know Your Michigan Turtles, and World Turtle Day (May 23rd) is the perfect day to add another turtle to our list!

Jim Harding’s MSU Critter Field Guide entry for the red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans) says that the turtle is named for the broad red or orange stripe behind the eye, which may extend onto the neck. He continues:

Red-eared sliders prefer still-water habitats (lakes, ponds, sloughs) with abundant aquatic plant growth and numerous basking sites in the form of logs or other emergent objects. These turtles are called “sliders” because they quickly slide from their basking spots into the water when disturbed. They feed on aquatic plants, and animals such as crayfish, snails, insects, tadpoles, and carrion. The young turtles are mostly carnivorous but eat increasing amounts of vegetation as they get older.

…This is a common turtle from northwestern Indiana south to Georgia and west to Texas and Oklahoma. Red-eared sliders are probably not native to Michigan, but breeding populations exist locally in the western and southern Lower Peninsula. Many thousands of baby sliders were once imported into this state for the pet trade, so it is likely that released or escaped specimens are responsible for the established colonies. Isolated specimens may turn up almost anywhere in Michigan.

Read on for more in the MSU Critter Guide.

Nick runs the excellent Herping Michigan Blog where you can find lots more of his excellent photos of Michigan’s reptiles and amphibians along with informative writeups. View his photo bigger and see more in his slideshow.

More Michigan turtles right here!