Make Isle Royale your office in 2022!

Tobin Harbor Sunrise by Carl TerHaar

Tobin Harbor Sunrise by Carl TerHaar

How would you like to wake up to this view?? Well, if you are a college student, the Isle Royale Wolf-Moose Research Project is seeking volunteers to assist with data collection for the 2022 summer field season. Students studying natural resources, conservation, ecology, or related fields will gain valuable field work experience working with distinguished researchers in Isle Royale National Park in the longest continuous study of any predator-prey system in the world. 

The opportunity is for 4-5 weeks between early-May and mid-June, and requires students to have documented experience backpacking & camping for extended periods of time in remote settings, proficiency with orienteering, and  the ability to get along with others in backcountry settings for 10-day periods of time are all critical. Get the full rundown of qualifications, activities & more on their website at IsleRoyaleWolf.org.

Carl is definitely Michigan in Pictures’s Isle Royale Bureau Chief! His photos feature prominently in our posts about Isle Royale & his photo of a Bull Moose Faceoff is one of the most popular photos of all time on Michigan in Pictures. He  took this way back in the summer of 2009, and you can see hundreds more in his Isle Royale National Park gallery on Flickr. For sure head over to his Mackinaw Scenics website to view & purchase his work!

Support Michigan in Pictures with Patreon

So Cold

So Cold by Julie

So Cold by Julie

With Michigan is plunging back into the deep freeze this weekend I think we can all identify with this little guy. 

Julie took this back in 2017. See much more in her massive Winter gallery on Flickr.

Stay warm folks!!

Support Michigan in Pictures with Patreon

Bobcat Bingo!

Bobcat by Paulv21

Bobcat by Paulv21

Bobcats are one of the most elusive animals in Michigan. Last winter I was “lucky” enough to have two of them race in front of me while driving. I say “lucky” because even though they were able to run in front of my car from a starting point almost next to me, I was able to slow enough to see them close up. The thing that surprised me most in addition to their speed was how muscular they are – seriously ripped!

Paul captured this bobcat last week with his trail cam which I think is in the UP is from Loomis near Clare, but as The Leader shares, bobcats are found all across Michigan, even in cities! See lots more shots in his 2020 Trail Camera gallery on Flickr.

More about bobcats aka Lynx rufus on Michigan in Pictures.

Support Michigan in Pictures with Patreon

Michigan Morning Magic

Morning by Emanuel Dragoi

Morning by Emanuel Dragoi

Simply gorgeous photo taken earlier this week by Emanuel. Head over to his Michigan gallery on Flickr for more & have a magical weekend!

Support Michigan in Pictures with Patreon

Faerie Lights: Bioluminescent Oyster Mushrooms

Bioluminscent Oyster Mushrooms by Jeff Baurs

Bioluminescent Oyster Mushrooms by Jeff Baurs

It’s not every day that I learn something new about Michigan, but the fact that Michigan has mushrooms that produce their own illumination is a new one to me!! PlantSnap explains that Bitter Oyster Mushrooms (Panellus stipticus) are one of over 80 species of bioluminescent mushrooms:

The mushrooms use a class of molecules called luciferins, which paired with an enzyme and oxygen, release light. Panellus stipticus (also known as the bitter oyster) is one of the brightest-glowing examples of bioluminescent fungi. It is found throughout Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America. These flat mushrooms grow on tree branches creating a mesmerizing effect as soon as the sun goes down. Foragers are able to find this variety growing around birch, oak, and beech trees.

The luciferins found in bioluminescent mushrooms are the same compound found in fireflies and underwater creatures.

They recommend that the best way to find them is by identifying them in the daytime, and you can head over to It’s Nature for a look at the bitter oyster mushroom.

Jeff took this photo a couple nights ago in southwest Michigan (Barry County). You can follow him on Twitter, Facebook & Instagram for more great pics!

Support Michigan in Pictures with Patreon

“Some day, all of this will be yours”

Frog Watching by Dan Bruell

Frog Watching by Dan Bruell

Dan took this photo yesterday in “perfect frog weather”. See more in his Pond Life gallery on Flickr.

More frogs on Michigan in Pictures!

Support Michigan in Pictures with Patreon

On the trail of Bigfoot in Michigan

Bigfoot feeder: Sasquatches Welcome

Northern Michigan Being True To Itself by Martin Hogan

WWJ News Radio had a feature on last month’s UP Bigfoot Conference in Munising:

“We wanted to spread the news, basically, that bigfoot is real, a real thing and in Michigan — specifically the Upper Peninsula.”

That’s the message from Richard Meyer, founder and organizer of the Upper Peninsula Bigfoot/Sasquatch Research Organization (UPBSRO) and the UP Bigfoot Conference to be held this weekend.

…”We have footprints. We actually have some on display this weekend with us,” Meyer said. “People have had a what we call a Class A sighting, where they’ve seen Bigfoot right there in front of them.”

As far as just how many could be in the UP, Meyer said it’s hard to put a number on it. However he said they’ve had “multiple sightings,” including of family groups of anywhere from two to ten Bigfoots at once.

“There’s a breeding population of Bigfoots, for them to have been around as long as they are…So it’s more than one creature,” he said. “There’s males and females, old ones and young ones.”

Bigfoots have been spotted, he said, all across the U.P.. from Drummond Island to Ironwood, and from Copper County all the way down to Menominee.

Meyer said, historically, there have been Bigfoots in the Detroit area as well. “There’s sightings from Belle Isle back from before everything was developed, where they had Bigfoots on Belle Isle and they were crossing the (Detroit) river.”

More at WWJ.

Martin took this photo of a bigfoot feeder in Kalkaska County (a known Michigan Bigfoot hotspot) back in 2019. See more in his 2019 Summer Trip gallery on Flickr. 

More Michigan Bigfoot stories on Michigan in Pictures!

Support Michigan in Pictures with Patreon

August 20: Giant Swallowtail with Thistle

Giant Swallowtail with Thistle Jacqueline Verdun

Giant Swallowtail with Thistle by Jacqueline Verdun

I’ve been saving this photo for 6 years apparently!! Way back in 2015 the Ann Arbor Observer had a feature titled The Biggest Butterfly: Seeking Giant Swallowtails that said in part:

The aptly named giant swallowtail is the biggest butterfly in Michigan.

Form your two index fingers into pointers and touch them to each other: if you take a large glove size, the butterfly’s maximum wingspan is approximately the length of both fingers put together. The field guides say around six inches.

The giant swallowtail’s coloration is as spectacular as its size. From the top, its wings look dark brown to black, with yellow dot ribboning and a yellow eye-shaped spot on the end of each wing. When the wings are raised, the bottom is revealed to be a subtle cream interrupted by wavy blue and rust bands.

Ronda Spink, coordinator of the Michigan Butterfly Network (michiganbutterfly.org), says she sees more and more of these butterflies each year. This species spends its Michigan winter in the pupa stage and emerges in two broods each summer, the first in May through June, the second in July through early September.

Read on for more including tips on the best time of day to see them!

Jacqueline took this gorgeous photo on August 20, 2014. You can check out another shot she took of this butterfly right here & see more in her Macro Insects etc gallery.

More Michigan butterflies on Michigan in Pictures.

Support Michigan in Pictures with Patreon

Prothonotary Warbler bringing the yellow

Prothonotary Warbler. by Kevin Povenz

Prothonotary Warbler by Kevin Povenz

All About Birds shares that the Prothonotary Warbler got its name from the bright yellow robes worn by papal clerks, known as prothonotaries, in the Roman Catholic church. 

Kevin took this photo back in June at Grand Ravines North Park. See more in his Birds gallery on Flickr!

Support Michigan in Pictures with Patreon

Foraging Friday: Black Raspberries growing wild

Black Raspberries Growing Wild in Michigan by Lee Rentz

Black Raspberries Growing Wild in Michigan by Lee Rentz

One of the things I love about summertime in Michigan is stumbling upon a snack when I’m out for a walk! Lee found these beauties near Battle Creek.

Head over to Lee’s Flickr for the latest & also check out his Facebook & leerentz.com to view & purchase prints.

Support Michigan in Pictures with Patreon