Year of the Rooster, 2017

fonzi-the-year-of-the-rooster

fonzi | by PepOmint

2017 is the Year of the Rooster in the Chinese Zodiac, and the Happy Lantern Festival travel guide explains that:

Rooster is the tenth in the 12-year cycle of Chinese zodiac sign. The Years of the Rooster include 1921, 1933, 1945, 1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, 2005, 2017, 2029

Rooster is almost the epitome of fidelity and punctuality. For ancestors who had no alarm clocks, the crowing was significant, as it could awaken people to get up and start to work. In Chinese culture, another symbolic meaning of chicken carries is exorcising evil spirits.

People born in the Year of Rooster according to Chinese zodiac have many excellent characteristics, such as being honest, bright, communicative and ambitious. Most of them are born pretty or handsome, and prefer to dress up. In daily life, they seldom rely on others. However, they might be enthusiastic about something quickly, but soon be impassive. Thus, they need to have enough faiths and patience to insist on one thing.

PepOmint shares:

Our baby rooster, Fonzi (you know…”chicks dig him”- lol) out and about in the yard earlier…he’s grown quite tall and loves the ladies…he’s also quite the runner and can chase them down with no issue. At the moment though, he seems to have found his voice and has been in a crowing contest with our old rooster Normie for a good week though..

He is such a pretty boy :)

View the photo bigger and see more in her slideshow.

Bonaparte’s Gull

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Bonaparte’s Gull, photo by Zach Frieben

All About Birds has this to say about Bonaparte’s Gull:

A small, graceful gull with bright white patches in its wings, the Bonaparte’s Gull winters near people, but breeds in the isolated taiga and boreal forest (north of us in Canada)

The Bonaparte’s Gull is the only gull that regularly nests in trees.

The English name of the Bonaparte’s Gull honors Charles Lucien Bonaparte, who made important contributions to American ornithology while an active member of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia during the 1820s. The scientific name philadelphia was given in 1815 by the describer of the species, George Ord of Philadelphia, presumably because he collected his specimen there.

View Zach’s photo from Noah Lake in Three Rivers background big and see more in his Migrating MI Birds slideshow.

Good Morning: Sandhill Crane Edition

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Good morning!, photo by Jiafan (John) Xu

View Jiafan’s photo bigger and see more in his sideshow.

More about Sandhill cranes on Michigan in Pictures.

Life in 2016: Tree Swallow Edition

Life in 2016 Tree Swallow Edition

Tree Swallows, photo by Joe Povenz

Some days I feel that this photo sums up the modern world. Try to listen every so often … you might learn something.

The All About Birds page on Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) says they are:

Handsome aerialists with deep-blue iridescent backs and clean white fronts, Tree Swallows are a familiar sight in summer fields and wetlands across northern North America. They chase after flying insects with acrobatic twists and turns, their steely blue-green feathers flashing in the sunlight. Tree Swallows nest in tree cavities; they also readily take up residence in nest boxes. This habit has allowed scientists to study their breeding biology in detail, and makes them a great addition to many a homeowner’s yard or field.

…Tree Swallows feed on small, aerial insects that they catch in their mouths during acrobatic flight. After breeding, Tree Swallows gather in large flocks to molt and migrate. In the nonbreeding season, they form huge communal roosts.

Read on for more, and if you have a little time, this article on Tree swallow farmer David Winkler is worth a read.

View Joe’s photo bigger and see more in his Songbirds slideshow.

More birds on Michigan in Pictures.

Dinner with the Ospreys

Dinner with the Ospreys

Can’t Wait, photo by Jiafan(John) Xu

Osprey Watch of Southeast Michigan shares some information about Michigan Osprey:

An Osprey is a large bird with a length of 22-25 inches, a wingspan of 4.5-6 feet, and a weight of approximately four pounds. The Osprey has a dark brown back and a white belly, as well as a white head, which features a dark stripe running from its yellow eyes to the back of its head. Female Ospreys are slightly larger than males and may sport a dark speckled necklace

..The Osprey dines almost exclusively on live fish, often catching its meals by hovering over the water at an altitude of 50 to 200 feet, then diving feet first into the water to catch its prey. The Osprey’s feet are uniquely adapted to “air fishing.” Each Osprey foot has a reversible front toe, as well as barbs, called spicules, which help it hold onto a slippery fish in flight. Normally, an Osprey will aerodynamically position a fish headfirst in its talons before it returns to the nest.

These talons definitely look like fish hooks – read on for more!

View Jiafan’s photo bigger and see more in his slideshow where you can also see shots from a trip out west.

More Michigan birds on Michigan in Pictures.

Bald Eagle Rescue by Wings of Wonder

via leelanau.com

Wings of Wonder Catching a Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle Rescue, photo by Ken Scott Photography

Wings of Wonder is a non-profit raptor sanctuary located in Empire, Michigan that focuses on the rescue and rehabilitation of birds of prey and also in educating people on their role in the natural world. Last weekend, WOW founder & director Rebecca Lessard led a very appropriate rescue for Independence Day. She writes:

Last night I was called in on the rescue of an adult Bald Eagle, down in Manistee County, who had a fishing lure embedded in his left wing, up near the shoulder. With assistance from Law Enforcement Officer P. Wiese I was able to successfully remove the large 3-hook rapella. Due to the severity of the wounds and the poor condition of this eagle it was apparent that the hook had been in his wing for quite a long time, preventing him from flying or eating. He had severe bruising inside his mouth and all around his beak ….most likely from trying to remove the painful hook, and he was extremely dehydrated, thin and very weak. Once we got the hook removed he was transported to Wings of Wonder and given fluids and small bites of clean meat. He spent the night in intensive care and this morning seemed to be feeling a bit better. Even tho he was still quite weak I decided to move him into our large 100 foot flight pen where he could get some fresh air, bathe, eat and rest. He was offered a large chunk of fish which he devoured eagerly.

These kinds of cases truly drive me crazy as they are soooooooooooo preventable. Fishing tackle and fishing line, as well as all other types of garbage and litter that is left behind, can result in a slow death for a variety of wildlife. Remember ALL of our actions result in a consequence … by making responsible choices our actions can help to make this world a more beautiful place … resulting in freedom, independence and health for all … a reminder on this 4th day of July…

(a huge thanks to Ken Scott Photography for the “imagery capture”)

Click to view the entire process from start to finish on Facebook and definitely consider supporting Wings of Wonder!

Red Mohawk: At Home with Michigan’s Pileated Woodpecker

Red Mohawk

Red Mohawk, photo by PK HyperFocal

The All About Birds entry for the Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) says in part:

The Pileated Woodpecker is one of the biggest, most striking forest birds on the continent. It’s nearly the size of a crow, black with bold white stripes down the neck and a flaming-red crest. Look (and listen) for Pileated Woodpeckers whacking at dead trees and fallen logs in search of their main prey, carpenter ants, leaving unique rectangular holes in the wood. The nest holes these birds make offer crucial shelter to many species including swifts, owls, ducks, bats, and pine martens.

…The male begins excavating then nest cavity and does most of the work, but the female contributes, particularly as the hole nears completion. The entrance hole is oblong rather than the circular shape of most woodpecker holes. For the finishing touches, the bird climbs all the way into the hole and chips away at it from the inside. Periodically the adult picks up several chips at a time in its bill and tosses them from the cavity entrance. Pileated Woodpeckers don’t line their nests with any material except for leftover wood chips. The nest construction usually takes 3-6 weeks, and nests are rarely reused in later years. Cavity depth can range from 10-24 inches.

Nest trees are typically dead and within a mature or old stand of coniferous or deciduous trees, but may also be in dead trees in younger forests or even in cities. Dead trees are a valuable resource as nest sites or shelter for birds and other animals, and Pileated Woodpeckers battle for ownership with Wood Ducks, European Starlings, Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Red-headed Woodpeckers, Eastern Bluebirds, and Great Crested Flycatchers. Occasionally bats and swifts share roost cavities with Pileated Woodpeckers.

Click through for lots more including calls, Pileated facts, and video.

PK HyperFocal’s photo background big and see more in his Feathers slideshow.

Lots more Michigan birds on Michigan in Pictures.