Everything’s coming up rainbows!

Double Rainbow over the Narrows, photo by Elijah Allen

I guess one of the advantages of getting a lot of rain is that you also get a lot of rainbows! My friend Elijah took this on Monday night. The end of the bow is over the thin channel called “the Narrows” that joins North & South Lake Leelanau.

View Elijah’s photo bigger and follow him on Facebook for lots more cool shots!

Many more rainbows on Michigan in Pictures!

Lake Dreams

Lake Dreams, photo by Francios

I hope your lake dreams come true this weekend!

About the photo Francois writes: A capture taken very early in the morning with fog and mist stretched across the lakes at Leelanau. Processed for a suitable dreamy hazy feel as the light was almost a blue & golden hue. The boat was anchored and just drifting in the fog with wonderful reflections on the water.

View the photo bigger and see more in his Michigan Journeys slideshow.

Stillwater

Stillwater, photo by Jamey Robertson

One of the things I love about spring in Michigan – even in a very windy spring like 2017 – are those days when the water is smooth as glass.

View the photo of the soon to be filled Northport Marina bigger and follow Jamey on Instagram for more.

February Ice … and 10,000 Leelanau Photos

february-ice

Lake Michigan … February ice, photo by Ken Scott Photography

Some followers of Michigan in Pictures may know that I live in Leelanau County, the village of Leland to be precise. The first website I ever built was Leelanau.com, and as with Michigan in Pictures, I have a photo group on Flickr. One of my favorite pursuits is hiking the shoreline, and when I returned from a hike yesterday, I noticed that the Leelanau.com Group had 9,999 photos. The 9999th is the one above from a year ago, fittingly by top contributor, professional photographer, and dedicated Leelanau-booster Ken Scott.  I realized that I had a pic from almost exactly the same spot!

View Ken’s photo on Flickr, see more in his Lake Michigan Ice & Caves slideshow, and follow Ken Scott Photography on Facebook!

wavy-day-in-leland

You can see mine and more photos & videos from the day in my Wavy Day in Leland slideshow.

PS: The Absolute Michigan pool is the one I use for Michigan in Pictures, and it has well over 200,000 photos!

Horn Road Orchard

Horn Road Orchard

Horn Road Orchard, photo by Mark Smith

Up here in the Traverse City area we don’t have cherry blossoms yet, but I’ve been seeing reports that cherries and other fruit crops are in bloom in southwest Michigan. Expect the TC area to bloom in a week or two and please share what you’re seeing in the comments!

View Mark’s photo background bigilicious and see more in his East of Leland slideshow.

More spring wallpaper and more orchards on Michigan in Pictures.

Pure Michigan Picnic: April Edition

Pure Michigan Picnic April 2016 Edition

Nice Day for a Picnic, photo by mileelanau

I don’t usually post my own photos on Michigan in Pictures, but I felt I had to share this one from Sunday. Pure Michigan! …yay??

mileelanau is the Instagram for my “flagship” Leelanau.com, and where I post pictures from hiking around northern lower Michigan. Follow mileelanau on Instagram for more.

PS: This turned out to be the picnic table of some old family friends. Loved discovering that on Facebook!! ;)

PPS: More beach and more Lake Michigan photos on Michigan in Pictures.

Why is Ice Blue or Green?

The Blue Ice

The Blue Ice, photo by Charles Bonham

The Causes of Color answers the question: What causes the blue color that sometimes appears in snow and ice?

As with water, this color is caused by the absorption of both red and yellow light (leaving light at the blue end of the visible light spectrum). The absorption spectrum of ice is similar to that of water, except that hydrogen bonding causes all peaks to shift to lower energy – making the color greener. This effect is augmented by scattering within snow, which causes the light to travel an indirect path, providing more opportunity for absorption. From the surface, snow and ice present a uniformly white face. This is because almost all of the visible light striking the snow or ice surface is reflected back, without any preference for a single color within the visible spectrum.

The situation is different for light that is not reflected, but penetrates or is transmitted into the snow. As this light travels into the snow or ice, the ice grains scatter a large amount of light. If the light is to travel over any distance it must survive many such scattering events. In other words, it must keep scattering and not be absorbed. We usually see the light coming back from the near surface layers (less than 1 cm) after it has been scattered or bounced off other snow grains only a few times, and it still appears white.

In simplest of terms, think of the ice or snow layer as a filter. If it is only a centimeter thick, all the light makes it through; if it is a meter thick, mostly blue light makes it through. This is similar to the way coffee often appears light when poured, but much darker when it is in a cup.

Click through for lots more about light & color!

Charles took this photo last March off Gills Pier on the Leelanau Peninsula when there was a whole lot more ice than there is this winter. View it background bigilicious and see more in his Leelanau Peninsula slideshow.

More winter wallpaper and more amazing ice on Michigan in Pictures.