Road Closed in Glen Arbor

Road Closed in Glen Arbor, photo via the Glen Arbor Sun

One more day of storm reporting from my neck of the woods…

In Glen Arbor Hit By Knockout Storm, Jacob Wheeler of the Glen Arbor Sun lays out a diary of the destruction of the storm and wrote:

In the storm’s wake yesterday, Glen Arbor residents immediately recognized that the destruction they witnessed was unprecedented for our town. This was worse than the 1987 storm, people said. In fact, it was far worse. The storm was more powerful and more destructive than any other Glen Arbor storm ever recorded. And now we have stats to prove it.

I spoke late this afternoon to Jeff Lutz, meteorologist with the National Weather Service (NWS) in Gaylord. While Lutz clarified that yesterday’s storm was not a tornado (you can blame some of the hyperbole on this newspaper) he did confirm that the straight-line winds which accompanied the sudden thunderstorm reached speeds of 100 miles per hour. That’s strong enough to be called a tornado. More significantly, it blows away the previous wind velocity record for Leelanau County. According to the NWS, on Sept. 13, 2005, a barrage of wind traveling at 63 miles per hour hit Leland and Empire, but not Glen Arbor. But 63 is not 100. Not even close. Nope, yesterday’s storm was the strongest to ever hit Leelanau County, since records were kept starting in 1950.

You can click through to the Sun for more pics and storm coverage and get even more on their Facebook. Jacob also shared the National Weather Service’s Aug. 2 severe weather recap:

  • Multiple rounds of severe weather impacted northern Michigan on August 2nd, 2015. The first severe thunderstorm warning was issued 10:34 am with an additional 27 warnings being issued before the last warning of the day expired at 8:00 pm.
  • The largest hail reported was 4.25″, or the size of a softball, seven miles north of West Branch at 4:55 pm. The large hail was reported by trained spotters and members of the public. There were several reports of damage to vehicles and other property. At the time of the event, a Severe Thunderstorm Warning was in effect for all of Ogemaw County, issued at 4:33 pm. Additional reports of 1.00″ to 2.00″ hail were received from law enforcement, emergency managers, trained spotters and the public across multiple locations in northern Michigan.
  • The 4.25″ hail observed seven miles north of West Branch was the largest documented hail stone ever to impact northern Michigan since records began in 1950 and the largest since 1998 when a 3.50″ hail stone was recorded in Arenac County.
  • Hundreds of downed trees and power lines were reported on Sunday as 60-80 mph (locally 90-100 mph) straight-line winds accompanied the severe thunderstorms.

Lots more at that link including some pics of that hail.

Jellyfish Stormfront

August 3, 2015

Old Mission Storm Cloud

 

Untitled, photo by Tom Parrent

Tom shot this last night on Traverse City’s Old Mission Peninsula.

Some staggering storming here in my hometown. Here’s some pics you might be able to see from my friend Kelly and some from my neighborhood.

View Tom’s photo bigger on Facebook and see more right here.

Superior Flight

August 1, 2015

Superior Flight

Superior Flight, photo by Cory Genovese

Cory writes:

Have a Yoop-tastic weekend and be sure to get your Superior flight on ;)

I’ve got an amen for that!

View cory’s photo bigger, see more in his Yoop Life slideshow and definitely follow him at PhotoYoop on Facebook!

A good sunset

Finally….a good sunset to watch, photo by Kevin Povenz

Kevin writes that it’s been awhile since he’s gotten to see a good sunset. View it bigger and see more in his massive Sunrise / Sunset slideshow.

Of course there are lots more Michigan sunsets on Michigan in Pictures.

Spray Falls in the Pictured Rocks

Spray Falls, photo by David Juckett

Go Waterfalling’s page on Spray Falls begins:

Spray Falls is the remotest, and perhaps the most impressive of the several waterfalls in Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. The 70′ waterfall plunges over the cliffs at Pictured Rocks and lands directly in Lake Superior.

The falls is right on the edge of the cliffs, and the creek has not cut back into the cliffs at all, so it is impossible to view the falls from the front unless you are on the water. The cliffs are sheer for miles in both directions, so there is no way to get near the base of the falls without a watercraft. Lake Superior is too cold for swimming. :)

The Lakeshore Trail passes right over the top of the falls, and you can get right to the brink of the falls. Be careful because the cliffs are undercut and unsafe in many places. About 1/4 mile east of the falls there is a safe lookout point from which you can get a nice, but distant, side view of the falls. There is a sign marking the lookout.

Read on for more including tips on hiking in and photos from the top. You can get views like this on the Pictured Rocks Cruises.

View David’s photo background bigtacular and jump into his slideshow for more great views of the Pictured Rocks!

More summer wallpaper and more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

Shoreline Trek

July 27, 2015

Lake Michigan Pyramid Point

Lake Michigan … points along the bay, photo by Ken Scott

My friend Ken Scott has been walking the shore of the Leelanau Peninsula for the past year and a half. He writes that the point to the left is Pyramid Point in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore but he doesn’t know what name (if any) the other point is. Anyone know?

View Ken’t photo bigger, follow him at Ken Scott Photography on Facebook and definitely check out his Shoreline Trek slideshow.

Lots more Lake Michigan on Michigan in Pictures.

Fayette State Park

July 25, 2015

Fayette State Park

Fayette State Park, photo by Mike Boburka

The Michigan Historical Center’s page on the Fayette Historic Townsite says:

The Fayette Historic Townsite includes 20 historic buildings, exhibits, a walking tour and scenic overlooks. Fayette has 20 preserved buildings and structures. Eleven buildings house museum exhibits and are open to the public, including the hotel, machine shop, company office, town hall, and residences.

A massive blast furnace still stands on the site, and is part of the well-preserved history of this former 19th century industrial site. Fayette is a living museum, telling the story of a company town in the 19th century, nestled on the Garden Peninsula in the central Upper Peninsula.

The limestone bluffs on Snail Shell Harbor were mined for use in the blast furnaces.
Exhibit with clothing and toys, part of the children’s exhibit at Fayette Historic Townsite.
Exhibits at Fayette focus on life in a company town, including what it was like to grow up there. At its height, half the population of Fayette was children.

The townsite is part of Fayette Historic State Park and on the second Saturday of August the annual Heritage Day celebrates Fayette with period displays, food, and music. Click through for more.

View Mike’s photo background big and click for more of Mike’s Fayette photos.

More Michigan ghost towns on Michigan in Pictures.

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