michigan petoskey stone

michigan petoskey stone, photo by Jacob Vanderheyden

The ArtPrize Seven Final 20 has been announced with 3 of the top entries from 2013 once again in the running. Click the link to see them all, incuding this one: michigan petoskey stone by Randall Libby from Manistee. It’s on display at the DeVos Center – here’s the scoop:

WORLDS LARGEST PETOSKEY STONE DISPLAY Using petoskey stone and fossil, a framed two-dimensional display with a square shape that measures approximately nine feet (9ft.) tall by nine feet (9ft.) wide / a depth of approximately 4 inches and a weight near 700lbs. Subject matter- State of Michigan map with all 83 counties. One of a kind Hundreds of hours of labor with hundreds of individual slices of semi-precious stone- this item is sure to compete for top placement in art prize. To see examples of earlier work go to petoskeystoneart.com

View Jacob’s photo background bigtacular and see lots more in his ArtPrize 2015 slideshow.

More of ArtPrize through the years on Michigan in Pictures.

Bond Falls in Autumn

September 29, 2015

Bond Falls in Autumn

Bond Falls in Autumn, photo by Tom Mortenson

Here’s the latest cover photo for Michigan in Pictures, one of many in the Michigan Cover Photos group on Flickr!

It’s from early October of 2013, and while it looks like our color season could be pretty darned good, it’s probably a little late this year. Via the Freep, it looks like the recent run of “Indian summer” is pushing color back:

The Upper Peninsula, which usually has plenty of fall color by this time in September, is still lolling around in green, reports Pure Michigan and the Foliage Network, which monitor fall color in the state.The very western Upper Peninsula as of Thursday was showing between 12% to 30% color, but the rest of the state had none.

Things seem to be about two weeks or more behind schedule.

Still, “cooler weather has taken hold and should help to get things going,” reports Market Rzonca, who runs The Foliage Network.

Pure Michigan’s fall color blog (Michigan.org/fall) predicted that peak fall color in the U.P., including Mackinac Island, is not expected to hit for about three weeks. Same with Alpena, Charlevoix and Ludington. Farther south, the show will come even later.

View Tom’s photo background bigtacular and check out more of Tom’s Michigan waterfall photos.

There’s more fall wallpaper, more about fall color, and more on Bond Falls on Michigan in Pictures.


Super Blood Moon Eclipse

September 28, 2015

Super Blood Moon Eclipse

Super Blood Moon 09/27/2015, photo by Alex Thorpe

While clouds marred much of this rare total eclipse of a perigee moon aka super moon, there were places & times that worked.

Check out this gallery of eclipse photos from Fox 17 viewers and definitely share yours and others you find on the Michigan in Pictures Facebook!

View Alex’s photo background bigtacular and see more in his slideshow. It looks like he got a little hint of the northern lights in the long exposure too!

More eclipses on Michigan in Pictures!

Wyandotte Falls Upper Peninsula

Wyandotte Falls, photo by David Hedquist

Waterfalls of the Keweenaw has this to say about Wyandotte Falls on the Misery River:

Misery River drains Lake Roland and Gerald (aka the Twin Lakes) westwards out to Lake Superior, passing over the small Wyandotte Falls along an otherwise twisted and swampy route. This waterfall is just downstream of a set of ponds next to a small set of cabins and the Wyandotte Hills Golf Course. Nestled in an older grouping of huge cedar trees and surrounded by smooth, moss-covered rocks, this waterfall seems ancient compared to the nearby golf course and state park. Also, due to the twin lakes upstream, Wyandotte Falls is susceptible to a rather large influx of spring melt.

You can click for more including photos and a map.

View David’s photo background big and see more in his Wyandotte Falls slideshow.

Many (many) more Michigan waterfalls on Michigan in Pictures.

Summer to Fall

September 22, 2015

Looking Out at Pictured Rocks

Looking Out, photo by Peter Tinetti

What a perfect photo from the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore for the last day of summer as we prepare to make the leap into autumn tomorrow.

View this photo background bigtacular and see more in Peter’s slideshow.

There’s more Pictured Rocks and more Fall wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures!

Behind every great photo…

September 21, 2015

Hogback Mountain Photographer

Hogback Mountain, photo by Chelsea Graham

Shots like these help me remember that behind every great photo, there’s someone who went through all the time and effort to get out there and take it.

Thanks so much to all of you photographers who share your work with me – there’s no way I could do what I do without all of your time, effort and love of Michigan.

View Chelsea’s photo background big and see more in her Michigan slideshow.

More fall wallpaper on Michigan in Pictures.

Marquette Lower Harbor Ore Dock

Lower Harbor Ore Dock, photo by Rudy Malmquist

Travel Marquette shares the story of the Iron Ore Dock in Marquette’s Upper Harbor is also known as the Presque Isle Dock.

The dock was built in 1911 and is still commercially active. Each year approximately 9.5 to 10 million tons of ore are shipped from this dock. The dock is owned and operated by the Cliffs Natural Resources. This steel-framed dock is 1,250 feet long and 60 feet wide, with the top deck sitting 75 feet above the water level. It contains 200 pockets, each of which has a capacity of 250 tons of ore, for a total storage capacity of 50,000 tons. Supporting the dock is a foundation of 10,000 wooden piles enclosed by a 12-inch thick timber sheet plank wall filled with sand.

After being mined the ore is crushed and the iron separated out with either a chemical or magnetic process. The iron is combined with a binding agent (a glorified cornstarch) and rolled into small balls roughly an inch in diameter. The balls are fed through a kiln and fired by temperatures exceeding 2,000 degrees F. The result is Taconite Pellets which are loaded on the ore boats and shipped. Most of the pellets shipped from the Presque Isle dock go to Algoma Steel in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario the largest integrated steel mill. These pellets, which are roughly 70% iron, will be combined with coke and limestone at the mill to make steel.

The ore comes to the dock via railcars and is dumped into steel “pockets” or bins beneath the tracks. To load the boat, the chute is lowered to the open cargo hatch and a door at the bottom of the pocket opens, allowing the pellets to run into the boat shown in the picture. Loading time is variable, depending on the size of the boat and how prepared the dock is to load. Four hours is typical. Loading is the responsibility of the First Mate. It is important to load the ore in a proper sequence to avoid over-stressing the boat unevenly. Each chute (or drop of ore) is about 20 tons.

View Rudy’s photo big as the sky and see more in his slideshow.

More Marquette and more aerial photography on Michigan in Pictures.


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